Tag Archives: Tom Rogers

Perfection at Sulphur Dell

Tom Rogers pitched a perfect game for Nashville on July 11, 1916, as the Vols won over Chattanooga at Sulphur Dell 2-0. The hard-throwing right-hander from Sparta, Tennessee who resided in nearby Gallatin and was known as the “Gallatin Gunner”, “Sumner County Scythe”,and “Shotgun”, struck out four in the game that took only one hour and 25 minutes to complete.

The feat had been accomplished only two times before in baseball’s modern era, by Cy Young on May 5, 1904, when the Boston Americans defeated the visiting Philadelphia Athletics, and by Addie Joss of the Cleveland Naps over the Chicago White Sox 1-0 on October 2, 1908.

Nashville Tennessean and American 07-12-1916 Tom Rogers Perfect GameOutfielders Billy Lee and Gus Williams aided in securing Rogers’ feat. Lee ran down a smash by the Lookouts Joe Harris in right-center in the second inning, even though he stumbled as he made the play. Lee held on to the ball and the crowd applauded their approval.

Williams performed a similar play by running down a seventh-inning Jake Pitler drive that was heading down the left field line. The left fielder nabbed the ball just before crashing into the fence near the negro bleachers.

Both pitchers held his opponent hitless for six innings. In the seventh inning, Vols second baseman Tom Sheehan managed his clubs lone hit against Chattanooga’s Jim “Lefty’ Allen. It began a rally of two runs as Howard Baker sacrificed Sheehan to second, and Sheehan taking third on an outfield error that was hit by Gus Williams.

Sheehan scored on a Dick Kauffman bunt that was not fielded cleanly by Allen, and Williams followed him home on a squeeze play that was performed flawlessly by Art Kores.

Nashville was not able to generate additional hits, and Allen finished with a one-hitter while Rogers completed his perfect game.

The previous season on August 15, 1915, Rogers had thrown a complete game, 15-inning shutout in allowing only three hits as Nashville won over visiting Little Rock 1-0. He ended the season with a 14-19 record in 293 innings pitched.

He continued his resolute performance in 1916. Rogers had shut out the Atlanta Crackers in his previous start before his unspoiled performance, giving him 18 straight innings without allowing a run. It was not until July 23 when Little Rock scores in the seventh inning that the first run was given up by him after 43 scoreless innings.

Tom RogersRogers would finish the season with a 24-12 pitching record in 317 innings as Nashville would secure its fourth Southern Association pennant.

A tragedy had occurred one month before Rogers joined the history books. On June 18, 1916 Rogers hit Mobile third baseman Johnny Dodge with a pitch in the seventh inning the game, striking him in the face. Dodge had lunged into the pitch to catch the ball before it curved, and although the injury was not considered to be serious at first, Dodge was hospitalized as a precaution.

The next day he dies from the injury. Teammates on the 1915 Nashville team, Rogers was distraught over his friend’s death, and Rogers continued to carry the tragedy with him until his own passing in Nashville in 1936 after 14 seasons of professional baseball.

His perfect game entrenched himself into the annals of Sulphur Dell history, as it is the only such accomplishment in the history of the ballpark.

Sources

baseball-reference.com

Nashville Tennessean and Daily American

newspapers.com

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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12th Annual Southern Association Conference at Birmingham’s Rickwood Field

Rickwood Field, Birmingham’s historic ballpark, is preserved through the efforts of the Friends of Rickwood and maintains Rickwood, built in 1910 as home to the Barons and used by the Negro League Birmingham Black Barons.

Over 200 amateur games are still played there, and each year the AA Southern League’s Barons host a regular season turn-back-the-clock contest dubbed the “Rickwood Classic”; this year’s game will be played on Wednesday, May 27th, as the Barons host the Jacksonville Suns at 12:30 PM. Former New York Mets star Darryl Strawberry will be the featured guest.

2015 ProgramA visit to Rickwood should be on every baseball fan’s list of places to visit. The ballpark hails a time when Sunday doubleheaders were played in the sweltering heat and future major leaguers hoped to move up the ranks to the majors. Each time I visit I think of what it must have been like for Nashville Vols Buster Boguskie, Lance Richbourg, Tom Rogers, Phil Weintraub, Bill Rodda, Boots Poffenberger, and Babe Barna to have played there. And how proud they’d be that it is still there.

It is such an iconic picture of baseball’s past that Rickwood has been used for commercials and movies.

The movie about Jackie Robinson, “42” utilized the ballpark during filming.

Like baseball? Like history? Like the history of southern baseball? Then you’ll need to remember this for the future: the Friends of Rickwood group sponsors an annual conference dedicated to the history of the Southern League (1885-1899) and Southern Association (1901-1961). It is a gathering of historians, writers, fans, and players who are interested in sharing their research, stories, and memorabilia.

The 12th Annual Southern Association Conference was held this past Saturday on March 7 after an informal gathering the evening before.

P1011126What took place? Well, the usual shaking of hands, pats on the backs, and hugs from friendships gained over previous conferences. But that’s not all.

The 28 attendees were treated to presentations on the birth of the Southern League (1884-1885); a perspective on Atlanta’s Henry W. Grady, an integral leader in the formation of the 19th Century league; an image of the 1885 Nashville Americans; a summary of a new book on the horizon about the Negro Southern League; and images and film about the Birmingham Barons.

P1011127Of particular interest to me was film presented by Birmingham and Memphis historian Clarence “Skip” Watkins which included color footage of a game between the Memphis Chicks and Nashville Vols. In color. Wow.

During the all-day event, we were treated to viewings of memorabilia collections and discussions about the old ballparks, teams, and what the future holds for southern professional baseball.

David Brewer, director of Friends of Rickwood, and Watkins came up with the idea in 2003, and the program has been ongoing since that time. The setting has changed from time-to-time, too: Chattanooga, Atlanta, and Nashville have hosted the conference and there may be opportunity to be in New Orleans in 2016.

P1011129Which leads me back to my original questions: if you are interested, you cannot go wrong. New Orleans or Birmingham, the Rickwood Classic or just a visit to the grand old ballpark in Birmingham. If you get your chance, take it in.

You can always ride with me.

 © 2015 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Nashville Held a Prominent Postion in the Southern Association

Newt FisherThe Southern Association of Baseball Clubs was organized at the Morris Hotel in Birmingham, Alabama on October 20, 1900 by Abner Powell, Charley Frank and Newt Fisher. Franchises were granted to six cities: Nashville, Chattanooga, Memphis, Shreveport, New Orleans, and Birmingham. Powell would become an owner in New Orleans along with Isidore Newman, Fisher would have a stake in the Nashville club, and Frank would own Memphis, further setting in motion the importance of the main founders.

Applications were also received from Atlanta, Montgomery, Little Rock, and Mobile. Later Little Rock and Atlanta are named as the two remaining clubs for the inaugural season. Meeting in Memphis on February 28, 1901, the Southern Association franchise originally awarded to Atlanta is transferred to Selma. The league’s schedule is also finalized.

Nashville’s team was off and running in the new league, winning the first two regular season pennants in 1901 and 1902.

After attempts to form a new league fail by disgruntled owners, on September 8, 1902 an agreement is signed in Memphis that the 1903 Southern League cities will include New Orleans, Mobile, Birmingham, Montgomery, Savannah, Memphis, Atlanta, and Nashville, with Little Rock, Shreveport, and Chattanooga eliminated.

1908 Nashville Vols FB

1908 Nashville Vols

In 1908 the Volunteers won their third Southern Association crown, followed by another in 1916. On July 11th of the Vols fourth championship season, Tom Rogers pitched a perfect game against Chattanooga, striking out 4. The game time was one hour and 25 minutes.

In 1918 many of the Southern Association teams were struggling as World War I impacted commerce and fan attendance, a shortened season was played and the directors of the league considered shutting down. Nashville’s attendance that season was 24,119, down from 79,018 the previous year. Ironically, 79,014 attended Nashville games at Sulphur Dell in 1918.

Sunday games had not been allowed in Tennessee well into the second decade of the Southern Association, creating an obstacle to scheduling. On March 28, 1919 John D. Martin, president of the Southern Association, arrived in Nashville to urge the State Supreme Court to render an early decision in allowing Sunday baseball games.

The Tennessee Supreme Court announced its decision on April 12, 1919 to permit baseball to be played on Sunday. The Court held that the blue laws of 1893 did not apply to baseball, as the game was not then being played.

In 1920 league attendance passed 1 million for the first time since teams began keeping accurate records in 1915. The league drew a total of 1,215,367 fans; Nashville’s home attendance was 102,529.

In 1931 Fay L. Murray, part-owner of the American Association Minneapolis Millers, purchased the Nashville Volunteers. In November of 1938 Murray would lure New Orleans manager Larry Gilbert to Nashville to become manager and general manager. Gilbert would also become a part-owner of the Vols.

Larry Gilbert

Larry Gilbert

In 1940 Gilbert’s Nashville club won the Southern Association pennant, followed up with the top spot again in 1943and 1948, Gilbert’s final season as a manager.

Larry Gilbert had an upstanding reputation. He was often called upon to meet with major league representatives during National Association meetings and was named one of the coaches for a game in Cooperstown, New York to commemorate the 100th anniversary of baseball. He also made out the Southern Association schedule.

On August 25, 1941, Southern Association president Trammell Scott postponed Nashville’s home contest against Little Rock out of respect to the family of Larry Gilbert, Jr., son of the Vols manager. The younger Gilbert had passed away the previous day from heart failure.

Led by manager Rollie Hemsley the Vols captured another regular season league crown in 1949.

Into the 1950s, Nashville was just one of many minor league clubs experiencing poor attendance. From a club record 269,893 in 1948 down to 92,199 in 1958, without fan support the league would not survive.

The New Orleans Pelicans owners announced on March 15, 1960 that the team was folding and would not field a team in the Southern Association. A charter member of the league, New Orleans would become the largest city in the US without a professional baseball team.

On August 29, 1960, Cincinnati Reds vice-president and general manager Gabe Paul announced that the Reds six-year working agreement would not be renewed with Nashville, effective December 15.  The reason given by Paul was because the Southern Association “does not allow the use of Negro players”.

RIPThe Southern Association suspended operations on January 24, 1962 due to “a lack of enough major league working agreements”; however, during the 1961 season average attendance for all games is less than 1,000 fans.

Nashville had drawn just over 500 fans per game during the 1961 and had been unable to secure a major league affiliation. With the announcement, organized minor league baseball is reduced to only 19 leagues for the 1962 season, from a high of 59 leagues in 1949.

Nashville was without baseball in 1962. Although the Vols were resurrected in the South Atlantic League for the 1963 season, poor attendance and a deficit of almost $22,000 forced the ownership group to surrender their South Atlantic League franchise without a dissenting vote from its board of directors.

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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The Gloomy Side of Nashville Baseball

RIPAt some point the glory of playing the game of baseball takes a turn. Nashville has not been excluded from the realities of the gloomy side of baseball.

One of the earliest records includes a resolution passed on May 9, 1867 at a called meeting of the Nashville Baseball Club. Although there is no detail regarding his passing, the resolution of tribute is for James Maguire, a worthy and esteemed member of the club who had just died suddenly. Members voted to wear the usual badge of mourning at all matches in which their club is a party to during the current season.

The first on-field fatality involving a professional baseball club in Nashville occurred in the first season of the Nashville Americans.  On August 14, 1885, Louis Henke of the Atlanta baseball team hit a hard grounder towards Nashville’s first baseman Charles Marr. The players collided at the bag and Henke’s liver was ruptured from the force of Marr’s head hitting Henke in his abdomen.

Admitted to an Atlanta hospital, Henke died from his injuries the next day. Sadly, Marr and Henke were boyhood friends and Marr was greatly impacted by the death of his friend.

The semi-pro Nashville Maroons lost the team’s star pitcher on October 9, 1891 Pat Milliron when he was shot by well-known horse owner and trainer William Amacher. Amacher called Milliron to the stable door at West SidePark in Nashville and without warning, shot Milliron. Supposedly, the trouble occurred over a woman, and the day after the murder Amacher had not been captured.

On June 18, 1916, Nashville pitcher Tom Rogers hit Mobile third baseman Johnny Dodge with a pitch in the seventh inning of that day’s game, striking Dodge in the face, fracturing his skull.

A teammate of Rogers’ the previous season on the Nashville ball club, Dodge passed away the next day.

Another incident related to Nashville baseball occurred on September 7, 1925. Evelyn Burnette, niece of Nashville baseball club president J. A. G. Sloan, was killed when the car driven by her uncle overturned on a curve of the Dixie Highway in Tullahoma, Tennessee en route to Chattanooga for that day’s ball game.

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Championship Caliber

With a 12-hit barrage on this date in 1943, Nashville roughed up four Pelicans pitchers to win the Southern Association championship in New Orleans 7-0. The series ended in the Vols favor, 4 games to 1.  Nashville had won the regular season championship with an 83-55 record, finishing four games ahead of the New Orleans Pelicans who had finished 78-58.

Winning the playoffs was not an unusual feat for Nashville; it was the fifth straight season for it to happen.

ImageBeginning with Larry Gilbert’s first year as manager of the club in 1939 when the team finished third but beat Memphis three games to none and over Atlanta four games to three, each successive season for the next four years Nashville repeated as playoffs champions.  It wouldn’t stop there, either, as the Vols would take the 1944 playoff championship, too, by beating Memphis four games to three.

Previous to the 1939 championship, Nashville’s only years to capture the pennant had been in 1901 and 1902 (the first two years of the Southern Association), 1908 (won on the last day of the season against New Orleans what sportswriter Grantland Rice named in one of his columns, “The Greatest Game Ever Played in Dixie”) and 1916 (the year that Tom Rogers tossed a perfect game). In each of those seasons, there was no playoff system in place.

After 1944, Nashville would win only one more league playoff championship, in 1949, when they were also the regular season champs. The previous year in 1948, Larry Gilbert’s last year as field manager, Nashville had finished on top of the season’s tally but lost in the playoffs to Birmingham. The closest the Vols would come again was in 1953 when they finished two games out behind regular season champion Memphis.

The influence by manager Larry Gilbert was strong, as it was during his leadership that the local club had its best success in the Southern Association.

When he retired after the 1948 season (he remained with the club as General Manager through 1955), his managerial success tallied 2,128 wins and 1,627 losses with eight Southern Association championships and six consecutive titles (1939–44).

Arguably one of the best managers in the history of minor league baseball, Gilbert was once thought to have been in line to lead the Cleveland Indians.  Gilbert would not let the conversation get much past the newspapers, and Nashville and Southern Association fans have had their managerial hero and his records to thank for the success of the Vols franchise.

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