Tag Archives: Texas

Nashville’s Swift Sherman Kennedy

Sherman Montgomery Kennedy was born in Conneaut, Ohio on November 13, 1877. His father, Benjamin, was a real estate agent, and his mother, Clara, was a homemaker. By the time his three sisters were in school and his brother was a farm hand, Sherman had already made his name in baseball.[1]

Little is known of his early playing days, but by 1899 he joined the New London Whalers in the Connecticut League, hitting for a .244 average while playing third base and outfield, and pitching to a 7-6 record in 14 games. He played only a few games for New London in 1900, but Kennedy began the inaugural Southern Association season in 1901 at short stop.

In the opening game in Chattanooga on May 2, he reached on an error, scored a run, and made an error while making a putout with three assists in the field. Nashville won in 10 innings, 15-14; the next day he dropped from seventh to eighth in the lineup but gathered his first hit on a single as his team won its second game 6-4.

By mid-season, he had moved to first in the batting order to take advantage of his speed. Nashville ended the season 78-45 to capture the flag; Kennedy ended the year with 50 stolen bases and was reportedly off to the major leagues.

snapper_kennedy_fbBefore re-joining Nashville for 1902, the 23-year-old played center field for the Chicago Orphans (now the Cubs) on May 1 against Detroit.[2] He was hitless in five plate appearances against George Mullin, striking out once. It was Kennedy’s only major league game.

When he returned to Nashville, Dennis Lowney had been signed from Little Rock to play shortstop, and Kennedy took his turn in center field where he played outstanding defense on the outfield hills of Athletic Park.

He made good use of his swiftness in a 7-1 win over New Orleans that kept the Pelicans eight games behind the leading Nashville ball club. Lead-off batter Roy Montgomery socked a long fly ball to right center in the first inning and Kennedy chased after it. Losing his balance just as he grabbed the ball with his glove, he rolled to the ground but held on to rob Montgomery of a sure double.

The Nashville American reported the play with near-poetic expression:

“Kennedy’s catch of Montgomery’s drive in the first inning was a thing of beauty and a source of much joy to the jubilant fans. Sherman fell sprawling on his back upon the bank in right center just as he got his left hand on the sphere, but he clung to the ball, nevertheless. It was a great play.”[3]

Suffering from a knee injury during the middle of the season, Snapper’s stolen base total was reduced to 29. He played in 98 games, hitting .261, and Nashville captured a second-consecutive pennant.

He signed a new contract for the 1903 season, but for whatever reason manager and club-owner Newt Fisher asked Kennedy to approve his being loaned to New Orleans for two weeks to begin the season. Refusing the assignment, on May 30 had two hits in his first two season appearances for Nashville.

“I came to play with Nashville,” said Kennedy, “and I don’t propose to play anywhere else. I like the town and the people. I also like Newt(.) Fisher, and I will be glad to play for him and Nashville, but I will not play in any other city of the Southern League. This is final and absolute.”[4]

But on June 4 he was in New Orleans in an experiment that did not work.  He did not show for the Pelicans game against Birmingham the next day, and on June 6 he shows up as Nashville’s shortstop against Little Rock.

Battling from third place with Memphis and Little Rock ahead in the standings, stealing three bases in a double header with Montgomery on August 12 and two more on August 15, adding a sacrifice against Birmingham.

“Sherman Kennedy has “come back to life.” Sherman is doing his best now and his fast work on the base lines is a joy to the Nashville fans. “Let’s get Kennedy on a base,” is the cry now. Sherman stole two more bases yesterday. If he keeps up this work he will lead the league “a block” in the matter of stolen bases.”[5]

He stole four bases, including a steal of home, and was four-for-four at the plate against Memphis on August 25, fans took up a collection amounting to $32.00 to show appreciation for his specialty work on the base paths. Near season’s end he stole nine bases in 11 games, and finished with a team-best 35 stolen bases (James Smith lead the league with 48, splitting time between Shreveport and New Orleans). Nashville fell to fifth to end the season.

On February 27, 1904, Kennedy arrived in Nashville with his wife and new baby with him. It was the earliest he had shown up to prepare for any season, and Newt Fisher was pleased.

“Manager Fisher and Kennedy spent Saturday at the home of the former, talking over the prospects for the coming season and discussing the players who have been signed. To-day they will be at Athletic Park and will get into uniforms.”[6]

Fisher wanted Sherman to play first base, and he performed admirably at his new position. But the tide turned in a game on June 23 with his club hovering around the .500 mark. Kennedy muffed a throw to first by second baseman Tom Smith. The error was so unlike the agile first sacker that the crowd began to boo.

“There was one of two reasons for Kennedy’s rank error; either he was not able to handle the ball or he dropped it purposely. If it was the first reason, then he is not a fit player for that important position. If it was the second reason, then it is the plain duty of Newt Fisher to put him on the bench and keep him there until he learns what the duty of a ball player is and does not let his temper run away with him…”[7]

The next week Kennedy apologized, and he began to play up to the standard his teammates expected. But on September 17 his father contacted him to say the Kennedy’s young son Frank, who had been ill, was not doing well.

…Kennedy left for his home in Connaught <sic>, O., on a night train, and because of the fact that the season is so nearly over will not return. Kennedy’s child has been seriously ill for some time, and this is no doubt the cause of his indifferent work of late. Other hard luck has also been staring “Ken” in the face for several weeks, and he was almost broken down from the heavy strain on his mind. Kennedy has many friends here who will regret the news of his child’s illness.”

Little Frank soon recovered, and Nashville finished with a 72-67 record, 11 games behind pennant-winning Memphis. Talk began to circulate that Kennedy would sign with New Orleans for 1905. Instead he played for Shreveport where he led the league with 57 stolen bases, tied with 51 sacrifice hits, and batted .290.

For an unknown reason, he did not return to Shreveport until July 11, 1908. The Pirates were in a neck-and-neck battle with New Orleans and Birmingham for the top league spot, and he was immediately inserted into the lineup in a double header with Little Rock. He had two hits and stole a base in the split.

His speed and his bat did not return to him. When the season was over, his batting average had fallen to .189 in 69 games.

Whether another calamity had befallen him is not clear, but his late-season appearance and anemic performance may have spoken for his retirement from baseball.

A 5’10”, 165-lb. switch-hitter, he played all positions except pitcher and catcher for Nashville between 1901-1904. His team won the first two Southern Association championships. “Snapper” had a .292 batting average, and averaged 37 stolen bases in his four seasons with the club.

At the age of 66, he passed away on August 15, 1945 in Pasadena, Texas and is buried at Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery in Houston.

*Author’s note: It appears Sherman Kennedy is often confused with Albert Kennedy; baseball-reference.com shows both players with the same nickname “Snapper”.

SOURCES

Ancestry.com

Baseball-reference.com

Nashville American

Newspapers.com

Retrosheet.org

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[1] 1900 United States Federal Census, accessed November 1, 2016

[2] Lee, Bill. (2003) The Baseball Necrology: The Post-Baseball Lives and Deaths of Over 7,600 Major League Players and Others. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc.

[3] Nashville American, July 16, 1902, p. 6

[4] Nashville American, May 31, 1903, p. 8

[5] Ibid. August 16, 1903, p. 6

[6] Ibid. February 29, 1904, p. 3

[7] Ibid. June 24, 1904, p. 7

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Walks, Unintentionally Speaking

Southern Association club directors passed a new rule in 1933 that startled the baseball world. It was intended to eliminate the intentional pass, especially those issued to power hitters. Fans wanted to see those players hit long homers and drive in runs.

A. H. Woodward

The rule was presented to league directors on November 17 by A. H. Woodward, owner of the Birmingham Barons. Credit for the new rule was given to Pat Linnehan of Birmingham, a local jeweler and baseball fan who had come up with the idea. Adopted by the league, the rule read:

In any inning of next year’s Southern Association games, after two outs have been made, if the pitcher delivers four consecutive balls to the batter, the batter shall be entitled to first base; and any and all base runners occupying bases shall be advanced two bases, except, in the event both second base and third bases are occupied, the runner on third base shall score and the runner on second shall advance to third.

When the National Association of Professional Baseball Leagues held its 32nd annual meeting in Galveston, Texas a few days later, there were plenty of opinions expressed. Judge W. G. Bramham, who presided over the minor leagues, felt the league could do as it pleased but advised that national rules would have to be adhered to in the Dixie playoffs between the Southern and Texas Leagues.[1]

Some said there were ways to avoid the rule. In either of these situations, the runners on base would only take the normal advance:

  1. In realizing his control is not very good, the pitcher could hit the batter after three balls.
  2. The catcher could tip the hitter’s bat.
  3. The catcher could jump in front of the plate to catch the pitcher’s throw[2]

In the December 14, 1933 edition of The Sporting News, Woodward defended the rule.

“After 25 years in baseball, the two things that have griped me the most are: (1) Playing for rain; and (2) the intentional pass. I look upon the average American as the best sportsman in the world. I believe his sense of fair play is of the highest order. These two things are offensive to him. The intentional pass is the cue for the manager to come out of the dugout and thumb the batter to first base, thereby giving an active demonstration of the fact that he was afraid of him. The batter is given no chance. The playing for rain is the hoisting of the yellow flag.

“By and large, it seems to me that the time has come for some innovations in the game, and I sincerely trust that the new rule, as passed by the Southern Association, will be given a fair trial.”[3]

It is likely the rule was intended for a situation where there were no strikes on the batter. As written, a pitcher could have two strikes on the batter, then throw four balls wildly with no intent. Thus, the penalty would be enforced on unintentional walks.

Larry Gilbert, manager of the New Orleans Pelicans, agreed.

“I think the league officials really meant for the one strike clause to be in the new rule but neglected to write it in before adjourning.”[4]

League president John D. Martin soon announced the rule would be revised to include the one strike clause, but also would include an amendment that would keep the rule from being interpreted that two players could occupy the same base at the same time.[5]

At a meeting in New Orleans on February 12, 1934, the league directors modified the rule with the adoption of an amendment presented Gilbert. The amendment read:

If in any inning after two outs have been made the pitcher delivers four consecutive balls to the batter, or hits the batsman with a pitched ball, or if the batsman is interfered with by the catcher, before the pitcher throws at least one strike, the batter shall be entitled to first base and any and all base-runners occupying bases shall be advanced two bases except with a runner on first base, or runners on first and third, or when the bases are full, each base-runner shall be advanced only one base, and except that when second and third are both occupied by base-runners, only the runner on third shall score and the runner on second shall be advanced to third base.

After utilizing the rule during spring games, some of the owners soured on the novel decree. On April 14th Martin announced the intentional pass rule had been rescinded by the directors of the clubs 5-3 in a wire vote. Only Birmingham, Memphis, and New Orleans voted to keep the rule in place.

Birmingham’s Woodward suggested to Martin that the clubs consider giving the rule a two-week trial, and they agreed.

Once the trial period ended, five clubs asked for repeal and the rule was unanimously rescinded on May 3rd. League president John D. Martin announced the result after a poll of the clubs.

“…the rule will not be effective in today’s game(s), or in any subsequent games,” was Martin’s final say on the matter.

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[1] Galveston Daily News, November 18, 1933.

[2] The Sporting News, November 23, 1933.

[3] Woodward, A. H. “Make Way for Changes in the Game. The Sporting News, December 14, 1933.

[4] Galveston Daily News, November 18, 1933.

[5] The Sporting News, December 28, 1933.

A. H. Woodward Image courtesy Alabama Sports Hall of Fame

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Another “Moonlight” Moment: Garth Mann

Moonlight3Many of us know the story of Archibald “Moonlight” Graham: he appeared in one game with the New York Giants in 1905 but never made an appearance at the plate. His character was immortalized by actor Burt Lancaster in the classic movie Field of Dreams.

Did you know there was a similar occurrence, this time with a Nashville connection?

Benjamin Garth “Red” Mann was a 6’0″, 155-lb right-handed pitcher who worked his way from Class D ball in Rayne, Louisiana in 1937 to the A-1 classification team in Knoxville by 1942. After World War II he was placed on the major league roster of the Chicago Cubs to begin the 1944 season.

On May 14, 1944, in the second game of a double header against the Brooklyn Dodgers, Cubs manager Charlie Grimm inserted Mann as a pinch runner for left fielder Lou Novikoff, who had singled. Mann took third on a double by Bill Nicholson, and scored on Andy Pafko’s single.

GMannCubs

Sixs day later on May 20th, Garth Mann was sent to Nashville. For the remainder of the Vols season he was 7-7 with a 4.88 ERA. During the next few years he would make it to Triple-A with Oakland, Sacramento, and Seattle before retiring in 1949; his pitching record was 114-86 with a 3.53 ERA over 11 minor league seasons.

Today is Garth Mann’s birthday, born on November 16, 1915 in Brandon, Texas. He passed away September 11, 1980 in Waxahachie, Texas at the age of 64.

May 14, 1944 was Mann’s only appearance in a major league game and like “Moonlight” Graham, did not make a plate appearance. It’s a less famous story, of course, but at least Mann scored a run and “Moonlight” Graham did not.

I wonder who would best portray Mann in his “Field of Dreams” story?

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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