Tag Archives: Newt Fisher

1904 Baseball Banter, Southern Style

Southern Association moguls met at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis on March 8, 1904 to discuss league matters, analyze the previous seasons attendance figures, and approve the season schedule for the year ahead. Those attending, and city represented, included M. J. Finn, Little Rock; Newt Fisher and J. M. Palmer, Nashville; Charles Frank, New Orleans; Lew Whistler and Caruthers Ewing, Memphis, Abner Powell, Atlanta; Coffee Jackson and Thomas O’Brien, Birmingham, James M. Foster and Robert E. Gilks, Shreveport; and Barry Holt and William Stickney, Montgomery.[1]

After approving league president and treasurer Judge W. M. Kavanaugh’s financial accounts, the group heard the executive committee’s report that confirmed the sound economic status of the organization. The report included a final tally of 627,602 fans who had attended games the previous season. Only four leagues (out of 21 across the nation[2]) had higher attendance: the National League, American League, American Association, and Eastern League.

The schedule was approved as drawn up by a special committee that had met in Memphis on January 22 and 23[3]. The 1904 playing calendar included 140 games, an additional 14 contests per club from 1903, and opening day would be held April 21.[4] There was some slight protest by Nashville’s Newt Fisher, as his club would host no holiday games, but “… utmost good feeling prevailed, and it was the consensus of opinion with baseball magnates and managers that the season soon to open would be the best and most prosperous in the history of Southern baseball.”[5]

But there was banter between sports writers. Newspapers often included articles of pre-season predictions, but those prognostications were not always about the teams in the newspaper’s own city; whether in jest or otherwise, there was often a quick retort from the newspaper of the offended city. With no claim by a particular sports writer, the Nashville Daily American published a story on March 10 that answered Birmingham’s razzing.

“The sage of Slagtown (see author’s note below), alias the baseball writer of the Birmingham Ledger who has a penchant for dealing out groggy dope, has bobbed up again as foolish and unmuzzled [sic] as ever. This time he comes forth with the bold bad delf (author’s note: abbreviation for deflection?) that New Orleans is “the strongest team in the league and Nashville about the weakest.” They ought to fix up a pension and a padded cell and keep them in readiness.

“The strangest thing of all is that nobody outside of Birmingham has ever figured the slag caters as being other than a tailender [sic]. The fact is, Birmingham is about the best team in the Southern League, except seven (there were eight teams in the league).

And then, it got a little personal.

“The Hams would be stars on the Red Onion Circuit, but they are useful by the Southern League principally to fill in and make up the necessary number of teams to keep the league going.”

When asked to respond, at first Nashville’s Fisher took the high road.

“What’s the use? It is actually wasting time to stop their howling. They do it every year before the season opens, and it takes about one swing around the circuit to get them quiet.”

But the even-tempered Fisher did not let the opportunity to further provoke the matter go totally to waste.

“Birmingham has not only had the pennant won every year before the league season opened, but has packed the flag away in camphor balls for the following season. Results are what count. We won the pennant twice and finished fifth the third time. I am not ashamed of this record. I would just like to ask the young man on the Ledger where the Birmingham team finished those three years. It was below Nashville each time.”[6]

At season’s end, Fisher could not boast about his club; Nashville finished in fifth place (second baseman Justin Bennett led the league with 166 hits, and pitcher Wiley Piatt led with 22 losses and 44 appearances)[7]. The nemesis of his team and the Nashville Tennessean, Birmingham, finished in fourth place. The Barons were two games ahead in the final standings. But for the fourth year the pennant remained on Tennessee soil as the Memphis Egyptians defended their 1903 title.

Otherwise, Fisher would not consider it a bad year. It had been reported he had cleared $10,000 profit on the ball club the previous year, and it was estimated that he would pocket $4,000 for the 1904 season.

It was a favorable year for the Southern Association, with Nashville, Birmingham, New Orleans, Memphis, and Atlanta all making money. Little Rock was reported to have shown a small profit, but things were less positive in Montgomery and Shreveport.[8] Even those clubs may have made some money.[9]

Soothed by profits of a successful season, the bosses of southern baseball saved their banter for another year of razzing.

© 2017 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Author’s Note: ”Slagtown” is in reference to Birmingham’s steel-making industry. Beyond the outfield walls of West End Park, often called the “Slag Pile”, was a hill of slag, a by-product of making steel.[10]

[1] New Orleans Times-Democrat, March 9, 1904, p. 12.

[2] Atlanta Constitution, March 9, 1904, p. 2.

[3] New Orleans Times-Democrat, March 9, 1904, p. 12.

[4] Nashville American, March 9, 1904, p. 7.

[5] New Orleans Times-Democrat, March 9, 1904, p. 12.

[6] Nashville American, March 10, 1904, p. 7.

[7] Wright, Marshall D. (2002). The Southern Association in Baseball, 1885-1961. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co.

[8] Atlanta Constitution, September 19, 1904, p. 7.

[9] Ibid., September 26, 1904, p. 9.

[10] Watkins, Clarence (2010). Baseball in Birmingham. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing.

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(Rain) Check, Please

Abner Powell, along with Nashville’s Newt Fisher and Memphis’ Charlie Frank, organized the Southern Association that began play in 1901. Powell had played and managed New Orleans beginning in 1888 and played for Nashville’s Southern League team for eighteen games in 1894.

He managed New Orleans in 1901 and 1902 and Atlanta’s entry in the new league in 1903 and 1904, and in 1905 sold his interest in his team and purchased a share of the Nashville club. In those days, loyalty to a particular team, especially when a player, was often trumped by investment power.

Powell is credited for introducing knothole gangs and ladies’ days to boost attendance at baseball games during his early years in New Orleans. And he invented one key item that became known as the “rain check”, the detachable stub on printed tickets.[1]

RaincheckRain outs have been the bane of team owners, players, and fans across the nation. Long before concessions and attendance added to the bottom line, paid attendance paid the bills.

Sulphur Springs Bottom was Nashville’s area for recreation and games were played at Athletic Park, later known as Sulphur Dell. It was a low-lying area just north of the city center, prone to flooding especially during spring rains. There have been many rain outs in Nashville, and the phrase “Rain, rain, go away” has been sounded for years, especially during baseball season.

Teams organized in the 19th Century and were at the mercy of the skies. On July 6, 1875 as W. T. Lincks and Morgans played to a 2-2 tie at Sulphur Springs Bottom before being rained out and the May 4, 1879 game between the Memphis club and a team from Nashville is rained out and postponed indefinitely.

Suspended games, postponements, and cancellations were the result. On June 26, 1895 Nashville played an unusual number of games in one day, three games against Little Rock due to the previous day’s double header being rained out. The first game is scheduled for 10 AM when only two opposing players show up and umpire Cline calls a forfeit in favor of Nashville as manager Dick Gorman explains that his team refuses to play three games in one day. The afternoon games are won by Nashville 17-7 and 8-5, and the Seraphs and manager George Stallings are credited with three Southern League wins.

More than 2,500 fans stood in line for nearly an hour on May 1, 1945 before Nashville’s home opener was called due to rain, and the next year on April 8 the exhibition game between the New York Yankees and Brooklyn Dodgers was cancelled due to morning rains and a downpour which came 45 minutes before the scheduled start. The outlook for the game had called for 7,500 fans to turn out, as all reserved seats were sold out and 4,000 fans were turned away.

Rain checks came in handy without rain on April 23, 1956 in a 12-8 loss to New Orleans when only 438 Nashville fans show up in 46-degree weather. Each was rewarded by general manager Bill McCarthy who announced the club would honor their rain checks for any future Vols game during the season. There was no rain, but the detachable ticket gave loyal rooters a way to attend another game free of charge.

Abner Powell was a visionary who gave many things to baseball that continue today: the rain check, ladies’ day, and knothole gangs. But his greatest invention may have been one that today’s players and fans take for granted: He innovated the covering of the playing field with a tarpaulin to keep the surface dry.

Team owners probably do not take that one for granted.

[1] Taggart, Caroline. Right as Rain: The Meaning and Origins of Popular Expressions. Great Britain: Michael O’Mara, 2013

© Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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“Volunteers” the Pick

Team nicknames are commonplace today, but in the early days of baseball it was not so. Cities claimed their teams by including the name of the leagues they played in, such as New York Americans, St. Louis Nationals, and so on.

Tongue-in-cheek references by sports writers often caught on. “Trolley Dodgers”, for one, stood for exactly what it sounds like. It was shortened to “Dodgers” for the Brooklyn team in the National League and was carried with them to Los Angeles.

Nashville’s baseball team had an early name, “Americans”, but the team did not play in any sort of league with that name. The local newspaper, The Daily American, claimed the team’s name as it gave the most thorough coverage of Nashville’s first professional team in the newly-formed Southern League.

The Southern League failed and re-organized throughout the remainder of the 19th Century and names for resurrected Nashville clubs included “Seraphs”, “Blues”, and “Tigers”.

When the Southern Association began play in 1901, nicknames were not widely used except when sports writers used references in a variety of manners. Newt Fisher became manager and local scribes would call the team the “Fishermen”. Under Johnny Dobbs tutelage the club was given the moniker the “Dobbers”. When service clubs were formed to boost local commerce, the team was often known as “Boosters” due to the support of those organizations.

One flippant remark to the quality of the team’s performance in 1907 was “Hustlers”. Apparently, there was lack of it.

As ball club ownership in other cities began to appease the fan base by adding an official team name, Nashville management did not seem to notice the importance. After all, some clubs used more than one.

If management would not approve it, at least writers and fans could settle in on one name that was unofficial. In 1908 the three local newspapers held a contest among fans to give the Nashville club an official name. Nashville’s three newspapers, American, Banner, and Tennessean, accepted mail-in votes from readers during the month of February, sent to Nashville manager Bill Bernhard, choosing from three agreed upon selections: Lime Rocks, Rocks, and Volunteers.

Grantland Rice was sports editor of the Tennessean at the time and his personal choice was “Volunteers”. The proximity of the State Capitol to the recently named ballpark, Sulphur Dell (Rice gave it that name in a January 14 column six weeks prior) and his premise that the name suggested courage, gave him reason to support the name.

On February 29, Rice announced in a Tennessean sports page headline, “Volunteers Wins Out in Fan Vote”. His column validated that 950 votes were cast for “Volunteers”, far-outdistancing the other choices.

He even states the name will stick, “…no matter who the manager or owner may be.”

The name did stick: Nashville remained a member of the Southern association from until it closed up shop after the 1961 season. For those 54 years the team was known as “Volunteers”, often shortened to “Vols”. Even the ownership group that had been formed in 1959 took on “Vols, Inc.” for the name of the new corporation. The club was revived for one additional season in 1963 as a member of the South Atlantic League.

When fans failed to support the team, the team folded; the Nashville Vols would be no more.

Tennessean 02-29-1908 Grantland Rice Names Volunteers Vols

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Author’s note: Much of the information included in this article comes from John A. Simpson’s excellent book, “The Greatest Game Ever Played in Dixie”: The Nashville Vols, Their 1908 Season, and the Championship Game. It is a wonderful account which provides as a resource for Nashville’s baseball history beginning in the 1800s up to an incredible season posted by the Volunteers. It is available from Amazon and other sources. You may read my review from an earlier post here: https://262downright.com/2015/04/10/from-my-bookshelf-the-greatest-game-ever-played-in-dixie/

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You Did It, Frank. You Did It.

I never thought we’d get to this point, but here we are. Fifteen years ago it wasn’t on the mind of most people, only a very few, and now we are putting a lid on one of the most storied years in the history of Nashville baseball.

Truly, it ranks right up there with 1901 when Newt Fisher organized the first Nashville ball club in the inaugural Southern Association season. It compliments the building of the new concrete-and-steel grandstand at Sulphur Dell in 1927.

Tonight is the final home game for the 2015 Nashville Sounds season. The team had a tough year but the Oakland A’s hook-up provided top-notch talent and the games have been exciting. This is our team.1stTnPark

First Tennessee Park is our ballpark, too. And it passed the test. It is a feel-good facility for Old Timers, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, Millennials, and everyone’s kids and grandkids. The stadium is nestled into the spot it was designed for, and the inside allows for gentle flow before, during, and after games.

Everyone can munch, walk, talk, watch, and cheer without standing in line or getting pushed around. We can even watch the game when we choose to stand in line, and when we are elbows-to-elbows it’s because we want to be.

It wasn’t a trial run season, either. From Opening Day when the Sounds hit the ground running to provide fans the best possible baseball experience possible to now, everyone is happy. I’ll bet there’s more to come over the winter, more improvements. I’m excited about 2016 already and everyone else should be, too.

Couldn’t you just see how the Sounds staff evolved? From just getting by at an old delapidated facilty to really enjoying their workplace haven, the difference was evident. Smiles got a whole lot more conversation going than blank stares, all adding to a great atmosphere as Booster and those staff members have become the game-day face of the franchise inside the stadium.

Frank_Ward.fwI doubt any of them wishes they were back at Greer Stadium. First-class fans needed a first-class ballpark, the one we deserved.

Co-owner Frank Ward delivered it and deserves a thunderous applause for that. The full-time face of the franchise quieted a whole bunch of disparaging citizens who said it couldn’t be done, that it wouldn’t measure up, that parking would be a mess, and that it wouldn’t be worth it.

Those folks probably came to see a game or two. And loved it.

Frank, thanks. A lot. We knew it could be done, and you did it. And you did it right where it belonged all the time.

See you at the ballpark, where tonight I will enjoy the Game on more time.

Until next year.

© 2015 Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Nashville Bugs, Builders, and Ballpark Construction

Nashville’s shiny new ballpark, soon to open on Friday, April 17th, is being constructed in the vicinity of its predecessor, historic Sulphur Dell. The original name is attributed to Grantland Rice who wrote in his Nashville Tennessean column in 1908 “…will be known as Sulphur Spring Dell, and not Sulphur Spring Bottom, as of yore.”

Rice immortalized the name in rhyme which sealed the name that fans (Rice called them “bugs”) adopted for the ages. The poem expressed the significance of having a stadium ready in time for Opening Day, too:

In Sulphur Dell 

There as a sound of revelry by day

In Sulphur Dell with axes swinging free –

And every fan there passed, yelled “Hip-Hooray –

Lay on McDuff, and give one punch for me.

And from afar the echo rolled in glee –

“The Nashville grandstand’s being torn away.”

 

Sweet are the songs which Madame Calve sings

But not so sweet as that of falling axe

In Sulphur Dell where every echo rings

With timbers falling under mighty whacks

Keep up the good work – break your blooming backs’

“Keep up the good work – break your blooming necks

We’ll give a cheer each time the axlet swings.

This was not the first instance of bringing the ballpark up to standards for the baseball season. As early as the spring of 1885 when Nashville’s first professional team came into existence, on March 24th it was reported that an extra force of workmen was put to work on the grounds of Athletic Park, grading the field and laying off the diamond before Nashville’s Southern League season would begin a few weeks later.

That did not stop games from being played: on March 30th and 31st, Nashville hosted a team from Indianapolis, and on April 1 over 1,500 spectators watched Nashville beat the Clevelands 15-7 and 3-2 the next day. On May 6th the Nashville club begins its home season with Chattanooga and 2,000 fans are in attendance as Nashville loses 9-7.

In 1897 the old bleachers on the east side were torn away and in their place were erected a large number of seats “such as are used in curcuses (sic).”

In 1901 when Nashville’s baseball team entered the newly-formed Southern Association, upgrades to the ballpark took place again, although as late as the first of April there were reports that dressing rooms for the players had yet to be constructed. Seating capacity was being increased to 2,500 with 1,000 seats available in the grandstand.

Newt Fisher, owner-manager of the Nashville club, announced on October 1, 1903 that the grandstand would be increased by 500 seats. Fisher was beginning his plans well in advance after what had been a profitable year for him. Fisher had made $10,000 over the course of the season.

When the ballpark was turned around for the 1927 season, the old grandstand was demolished and a new steel-and-concrete design was chosen to replace it. Winter weather and rain interrupted the process more than once, and in February, the contractor was offered a bonus of $5,000.00 to complete the structure for the March exhibition season.

Once again, games were played no matter the conditions of the grandstand. With the playing field in optimum shape and workmen continuing their work, on March 25th the first contest is held in the new ‘turned-around’ ballpark. It was an exhibition game played between the Nashville Vols and Minneapolis Millers, the Millers winning 5-3 as the visiting team’s right-fielder Dick Loftus hits the first home run in the new park.

It would be a while before more upgrades would take place. A new scoreboard was added in left-centerfield, but that would be the extent of new construction until a few cosmetic modernizations would happen. When fans arrived on Opening Day April 17, 1951, they saw a remodeled facade, new turnstiles, brick walls, wider exists and other improvements. Unchanged were the “dumps” in the outfield and the short right field fence.

On Easter Sunday, April 1, 1956 between 2-5 PM, the Nashville Vols management held an open house for the “renovated” ballpark. The playing field of the ancient park was altered somewhat by the smoothing out of the right field “porch”. Additional improvements consisted of a new coat of green paint for the stadium seats, except for the reserved seats section which were painted orange.

For the 1958 season a left-field bleacher section was torn down and a weather-damaged fence replaced, but no additional changes were made to Sulphur Dell during the demise of the facility and baseball in Nashville.

After selling light fixtures, stadium seats, and other items that had some remaining value, on April 16, 1969 the ballpark was demolished and filled in; the remains of the recent demolition of the Andrew Jackson Hotel (to make room for the Tennessee Performing Arts Center) was deposited on the site.1stTennPark

Other than rainouts and spring floods, there are no instances when Opening Day did not proceed as planned. Nashville games have begun on time, and there is plenty of confidence that the same will hold true this season.

Besides, April 17th is just around the corner, and we “bugs” will have to trust those who “break their blooming backs”. I believe we will be there.

 © 2015 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Nashville in the 1897 Central League

Nashville’s on-again, off-again love affair with the Southern League collapsed after the 1895 season, a year which saw George Stallings lead the Nashville Seraphs to a second place finish with a record of 69-38. Financial instability of teams from various cities, including Nashville, led to the league reorganizing once more in 1896. Six teams comprised the league but by mid-season Birmingham and Atlanta had dropped out; New Orleans, Montgomery, Mobile, and Columbus remained until August.

With the Southern in disarray as Memphis had no park in which to play and Atlanta having been accepted into the Southeastern League, only Columbus and Birmingham were committed to playing in the Southern League for a new season. It did not happen, although the league would re-organize for 1898 and 1899 but  would fail to complete the season either year.

On January 18, 1897, a new Central League was organized at the Acme Hotel in Evansville and five cities were repesented: Terre Haute, Nashville, Cairo, Evansville, and Washington (Indiana) agree to membership. It was determined to withhold the Washington membership until representatives from Memphis and Little Rock (who were expected at the meeting but failed to attend) could be contacted.

Although the complete lineup of cities was not determined, the organizers knew from experience with failed ball clubs just what they thought was needed to complete the season. For example, it was agreed that the player salary limit should be fixed at $900 and a $300 fee was assessed to clubs for membership with one-half due at the next league meeting and the remainder due one month later.

Controlling player salary limits were a driving force for organizing a new league but travel expenses were the main reason due to the proximity of all cities which had been proposed as members. Membership fees were to keep the league solvent for a complete season.

Gabe Simons of Evansville was elected President-Secretary-Treasurer of the Central League. Billy Works, manager of the Nashville team, was named Vice-President.

Works had become anxious to place a Nashville team in either of two proposed leagues, the Central or Interstate League. George Stallings and Charley Frank of Memphis assisted him in his quest. An Interstate League had been proposed by Works to have Nashville, Knoxville, Jackson, Memphis, Chattanooga and Little Rock as members. In a letter from Charley Frank to George Stallings, Little Rock, Memphis, Clarksville, Evansville, Paducah, Cairo, Henderson, Terre Haute, Fort Wayne, Springfield (Illinois) and Nashville were selected as potential cities in the Central League.

However, on February 12 representatives from Nashville, Terre Haute, Washington, Evansville, Paducah, and Cairo met in Evansville to finalize plans for the Central. Uniforms were even selected for each team: Evansville, cadet blue, white trimmings; Terre Haute, gray and blue; Paducah, old gold and maroon; Washington, brown and red; Cairo, gray and black; and Nashville, blue and maroon.

At a meeting on February 27 Washington was admitted to the Central League over Terre Haute’s opposition, claiming that Washington is too small a city to support a team. At that meeting the league adopted the Reach baseball.

On April 28 Evansville won over Nashville, named the Centennials, 3-2 in the opening game of the 1897 Central League season for both clubs. Approximately 500 fans were on hand at Athletic Park.

The financially sound (or so it seemed) Central League was up and running.

It was reported on June 1 by league president Simons that Washington (pop. 18,000) was averaging 700 at each home game, including Sunday games; Paducah (pop. 20,000) was averaging 800 patrons, while Cairo, Terre Haute, and Evansville were drawing “even more”. There was no mention of Nashville’s attendance but it should be noted that it was the only city not allowing Sunday games.

On June 3 Nashville dropped out of the league with no explanation. The team traveled to Cairo to continue its schedule in hopes that the team would be transferred to Decatur, Illinois. A week later the team was transferred to Henderson, Indiana.

The board of directors accepted the resignation of Central League president Gabe Simons on June 28th as Simons was hoping to take over management of the Evansville club and no longer wanted to shoulder the responsibility and “annoyances” of the League office. Mr. F. C. Winter of Washington was named president of the Central. By mid-July Evansville was without financial backing or a manager as Simons failed in his bid to take over the club.

CentralLeague_FB

On July 20 the Central League seasons collapses. After the disbandment of the Washington club, the other teams decide it is not worthwhile to continue as all teams are in financial arrears due to so many Sunday games having been rained out.

With another noble attempt to entrench Nashville into the world of professional baseball, it would be four years before Nashville’s Newt Fisher would be instrumental in forming the Southern Association of Baseball Clubs with his hometown as a member in 1901. That attempt would last: the Southern Association disbanded in 1961 and Nashville remained a member during the league’s entire existence.

© 2015 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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It Happened On This Day: December 6 – December 21

Marquee_On_This-DayDecember 6, 1925 – Today is the birthday of former Nashville player Rance Pless. A third baseman, Pless won the Southern Association batting championship in 1952 with the Vols with a .364 average

December 7, 1914 – Nashville Baseball Club president Clyde Shropshire announces he has scheduled exhibition games with various major league teams in the spring of 1915.  Among the games to be played are a three-game set with the Chicago Cubs April 4, 5 and 6, and the New York Giants April 7 and 8.  The Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox will also play games against the Vols but the dates have not been set

December 7, 1928 – Outfielder Blackie Carter and left-handed pitcher George Milstead are purchased by Nashville from Toledo. Nashville also sells catcher Leo Mackey to Mobile and trades left-handed pitcher Oscar Fuhr to New Orleans for outfielder-first baseman Beans Minor

December 8, 1948 – Rollie Hemsley is named manager of the Nashville Vols, succeeding Larry Gilbert who moves to the front office

December 9, 1930 – Today is the birthday of Nashville outfielder Bob Hazle who batted for .314 during 1955 for the Vols. Hazle played briefly for the Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Braves, and Detroit Tigers but spent most of his career in the minors

December 10, 1957 – Pitcher Hal Kleine, who earned a 4-4 record during the 1949 season with Nashville, passes away in St. Louis. Kleine appeared in fourteen major league games with Cleveland in 1944-45 but had a 10-year minor league career until retiring after the 1950 season

December 11, 1888 – Fred Toney is born in Nashville. As one of the outstanding pitchers in the National League from 1915 to 1921, Toney led the league in saves in 1918 and won 20 games in 1917 and 1920

December 12, 1947 – Larry Gilbert announces that the Vols will spend spring training in Pensacola, Florida in 1948

December 13, 1923 – Vols catcher Paul Eiffert is traded to London, Ontario of the Michigan-Ontario League for catcher Leo Mackey

December 14, 2004 – Rod Kanehl, former Nashville Vol player, passes away in Palm Springs, California. Kanehl was the first New York Mets player to hit a grand slam home run when he accomplished the feat on July 6, 1962. Kanehl was the only former Mets player to attend the funeral of Casey Stengel

December 15, 1860 – Today is the birthday of Abner Powell, who along with Nashville’s Newt Fisher and Memphis’ Charlie Frank organized the Southern Association that began play in 1901. Powell had played and managed New Orleans in 1888 and played for Nashville’s Southern League team for eighteen games in 1894. Managing New Orleans in 1901 and 1902 and Atlanta’s entry in the new league in 1903 and 1904, he sold his interest in his team and purchased a share of the Nashville club in 1905. Powell is credited for introducing rain checks, knothole gangs, and ladies days to baseball, and innovated the covering of the playing field with a tarpaulin to keep the surface dry

December 15, 1920 – Former Nashville pitcher and future Hall of Famer Waite Hoyt is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees. During the next 10 years Hoyt will win 157 games for the Yankees

December 16, 1934 – Today is the birthday of Jim Bailey, southpaw pitcher for Nashville in 1958 (10-11), 1959 (10-6), and 1960 (7-10). He pitched in three games for the Cincinnati Reds in 1959. Born in Strawberry Plains, Tennessee, he is the brother of major league catcher Ed Bailey

December 17, 1975 – Kerby Farrell passes away in Nashville. In 1943 he played in 85 games for the Boston Braves and returned to the majors with the Chicago White Sox in 1945. He managed one season in the majors for Cleveland during 1957

December 18, 1897 – Nashville Vols manager and player Lance Richbourg is born in DeFuniak Springs, Florida. Richbourg spent six seasons with Nashville, managing from 1934-1937

December 19, 2003 – Former Nashville outfielder Carmen Mauro passes away in Carmichael, California. In his only season at Sulphur Dell in 1948 he accumulated a .284 batting average in 85 games

December 20, 1915 – Nashville acquires 3 players from the Quincy club of the Illinois-Indiana-Iowa (III) League: outfielder Roy Sherer, catcher George Boelzle, and pitcher Louis Tretter. All are secured under optional agreement

December 21, 1925 – Bob Rush, who had a 13-season career in the majors and spent part of one season with Nashville, is born in Battle Creek, Michigan. Called up mid-season after posting a 6-1 record for Des Moines in the Western League, Rush was 9-7 with the Vols in 1947 and ended the season with a 3.40 ERA

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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