Tag Archives: Nashville

1904 Baseball Banter, Southern Style

Southern Association moguls met at the Peabody Hotel in Memphis on March 8, 1904 to discuss league matters, analyze the previous seasons attendance figures, and approve the season schedule for the year ahead. Those attending, and city represented, included M. J. Finn, Little Rock; Newt Fisher and J. M. Palmer, Nashville; Charles Frank, New Orleans; Lew Whistler and Caruthers Ewing, Memphis, Abner Powell, Atlanta; Coffee Jackson and Thomas O’Brien, Birmingham, James M. Foster and Robert E. Gilks, Shreveport; and Barry Holt and William Stickney, Montgomery.[1]

After approving league president and treasurer Judge W. M. Kavanaugh’s financial accounts, the group heard the executive committee’s report that confirmed the sound economic status of the organization. The report included a final tally of 627,602 fans who had attended games the previous season. Only four leagues (out of 21 across the nation[2]) had higher attendance: the National League, American League, American Association, and Eastern League.

The schedule was approved as drawn up by a special committee that had met in Memphis on January 22 and 23[3]. The 1904 playing calendar included 140 games, an additional 14 contests per club from 1903, and opening day would be held April 21.[4] There was some slight protest by Nashville’s Newt Fisher, as his club would host no holiday games, but “… utmost good feeling prevailed, and it was the consensus of opinion with baseball magnates and managers that the season soon to open would be the best and most prosperous in the history of Southern baseball.”[5]

But there was banter between sports writers. Newspapers often included articles of pre-season predictions, but those prognostications were not always about the teams in the newspaper’s own city; whether in jest or otherwise, there was often a quick retort from the newspaper of the offended city. With no claim by a particular sports writer, the Nashville Daily American published a story on March 10 that answered Birmingham’s razzing.

“The sage of Slagtown (see author’s note below), alias the baseball writer of the Birmingham Ledger who has a penchant for dealing out groggy dope, has bobbed up again as foolish and unmuzzled [sic] as ever. This time he comes forth with the bold bad delf (author’s note: abbreviation for deflection?) that New Orleans is “the strongest team in the league and Nashville about the weakest.” They ought to fix up a pension and a padded cell and keep them in readiness.

“The strangest thing of all is that nobody outside of Birmingham has ever figured the slag caters as being other than a tailender [sic]. The fact is, Birmingham is about the best team in the Southern League, except seven (there were eight teams in the league).

And then, it got a little personal.

“The Hams would be stars on the Red Onion Circuit, but they are useful by the Southern League principally to fill in and make up the necessary number of teams to keep the league going.”

When asked to respond, at first Nashville’s Fisher took the high road.

“What’s the use? It is actually wasting time to stop their howling. They do it every year before the season opens, and it takes about one swing around the circuit to get them quiet.”

But the even-tempered Fisher did not let the opportunity to further provoke the matter go totally to waste.

“Birmingham has not only had the pennant won every year before the league season opened, but has packed the flag away in camphor balls for the following season. Results are what count. We won the pennant twice and finished fifth the third time. I am not ashamed of this record. I would just like to ask the young man on the Ledger where the Birmingham team finished those three years. It was below Nashville each time.”[6]

At season’s end, Fisher could not boast about his club; Nashville finished in fifth place (second baseman Justin Bennett led the league with 166 hits, and pitcher Wiley Piatt led with 22 losses and 44 appearances)[7]. The nemesis of his team and the Nashville Tennessean, Birmingham, finished in fourth place. The Barons were two games ahead in the final standings. But for the fourth year the pennant remained on Tennessee soil as the Memphis Egyptians defended their 1903 title.

Otherwise, Fisher would not consider it a bad year. It had been reported he had cleared $10,000 profit on the ball club the previous year, and it was estimated that he would pocket $4,000 for the 1904 season.

It was a favorable year for the Southern Association, with Nashville, Birmingham, New Orleans, Memphis, and Atlanta all making money. Little Rock was reported to have shown a small profit, but things were less positive in Montgomery and Shreveport.[8] Even those clubs may have made some money.[9]

Soothed by profits of a successful season, the bosses of southern baseball saved their banter for another year of razzing.

© 2017 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Author’s Note: ”Slagtown” is in reference to Birmingham’s steel-making industry. Beyond the outfield walls of West End Park, often called the “Slag Pile”, was a hill of slag, a by-product of making steel.[10]

[1] New Orleans Times-Democrat, March 9, 1904, p. 12.

[2] Atlanta Constitution, March 9, 1904, p. 2.

[3] New Orleans Times-Democrat, March 9, 1904, p. 12.

[4] Nashville American, March 9, 1904, p. 7.

[5] New Orleans Times-Democrat, March 9, 1904, p. 12.

[6] Nashville American, March 10, 1904, p. 7.

[7] Wright, Marshall D. (2002). The Southern Association in Baseball, 1885-1961. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Co.

[8] Atlanta Constitution, September 19, 1904, p. 7.

[9] Ibid., September 26, 1904, p. 9.

[10] Watkins, Clarence (2010). Baseball in Birmingham. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing.

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14th Annual Southern Association Conference at Rickwood Field

scan0001Yesterday, I attended the 14th annual Southern Association Conference in Birmingham, and want to take this time to encourage you to be a part of this event next year. The Rickwood Field SABR chapter put on quite a conference, led by David Brewer and Clarence Watkins; but the opportunity to visit Rickwood Field is great in itself – it is truly one of America’s historic ballparks.

To be able to hear presentations about baseball in the South, among friends in a casual setting, was great. To wax poetic: Baseball was literally “in the air”.  Attendees came from Mobile, Memphis, Nashville, Birmingham, Montgomery, and Atlanta; we heard presentations about baseball in Montgomery (and pitcher Roy “Goat” Walker), Selma, the Southern Association, and vintage player A. T. Pearsall, but sidebar conversations were ongoing beyond.

An added treat was lunch with former Montgomery Rebels player and minor league manager Ted Brazell. One could literally hear and feel the passion Ted has with his love of the game of baseball. It was inspiring.

More than anything, the friendships rekindled and friendships made were more than worth the trip. The date could change, but put the first Saturday of March, 2018 on your calendar. You won’t be disappointed.

© 2017 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Sulphur Dell: What was in the Water?

nashville-republican-banner-short-version-june-1-1841-j-h-bransford In the late 1700s, pioneers discovered a special place on the banks of the Cumberland River where a natural sulphur spring flowed, and deer and other wildlife licked the mineral salt. Named French Lick Branch, the creek ran through “Sulphur Spring Bottom”, a low-lying section of Nashville which soon became the city park. A ball field was established where games could be played, and picnics, horse racing, and other leisurely events were held.

In 1841, the Republican Banner reported that J. H. Bransford, a partner in the dry goods business of Maulding & Bransford, found opportunity to refit the spring for bathing purposes. The city allowed Bransford to take on the project, but in return he agreed to not charge patrons for its use. Being the entrepreneur that he was, however, J. H. would certainly offer “fruit, cigars, &c.”[1] for sale.

1828-fwIn a newspaper notice of June 1 to announce his venture, Bransford noted a chemical analysis on the water at the spring had been performed by a “Professor Bowen” in 1827. The analyzer was most certainly, George T. Bowen, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Nashville. Per a November 18, 1928 death notice in the Hartford Courant, young Dr. Bowen had passed away at the age of 28[2]. Hopefully, his demise did not come about from inhaling the pungent sulphur during his assessment.

nashville-republican-banner-long-june-1-1841-j-h-bransfordNonetheless, the examination was repeated by Dr. Gerard Troost, Tennessee State Geologist, who moved to the area in 1928 from Indiana to become professor of mineralogy and chemistry at the University of Nashville. and was probably a colleague of Bowen. Undoubtedly, Troost suffered no ill health from his inspection of the sulphur spring, as he died in 1850 as a result of a cholera outbreak in Nashville.[3]

The Republican Banner article goes on to lists the results of both distinguished chemists. Dr. Troost’s results proved the close resemblance of Nashville’s sulphur spring composition to that of Harrogate Springs in England. Today, the establishment is the oldest bottler of water, dating back to the 16th century.[4] By comparing the mineral content of a world-famous sulphur spring, to one discovered only a few decades before, Bransford was establishing the quality of the resort he was to build.

Bransford, Bowen, nor Troost could have conceived, yet even imagined, the historical significance of what would become Nashville’s Sulphur Dell. The magicial springs gave way to the ballpark’s mysterious smell, flavor, and mystique for years to come.

© 2017 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[1] Nashville Republican Banner, June 1, 1841, p. 2.

[2] Hartford Courant, November 18, 1828, p. 3.

[3] Gerard Troost (1776-1850) , Geologist. http://faculty.evansville.edu/ck6/bstud/troost.html, retrieved February 28, 2017.

[4] Harrogatespring.com. http://www.harrogatespring.com, retrieved February 28, 2017.

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Nashville’s Swift Sherman Kennedy

Sherman Montgomery Kennedy was born in Conneaut, Ohio on November 13, 1877. His father, Benjamin, was a real estate agent, and his mother, Clara, was a homemaker. By the time his three sisters were in school and his brother was a farm hand, Sherman had already made his name in baseball.[1]

Little is known of his early playing days, but by 1899 he joined the New London Whalers in the Connecticut League, hitting for a .244 average while playing third base and outfield, and pitching to a 7-6 record in 14 games. He played only a few games for New London in 1900, but Kennedy began the inaugural Southern Association season in 1901 at short stop.

In the opening game in Chattanooga on May 2, he reached on an error, scored a run, and made an error while making a putout with three assists in the field. Nashville won in 10 innings, 15-14; the next day he dropped from seventh to eighth in the lineup but gathered his first hit on a single as his team won its second game 6-4.

By mid-season, he had moved to first in the batting order to take advantage of his speed. Nashville ended the season 78-45 to capture the flag; Kennedy ended the year with 50 stolen bases and was reportedly off to the major leagues.

snapper_kennedy_fbBefore re-joining Nashville for 1902, the 23-year-old played center field for the Chicago Orphans (now the Cubs) on May 1 against Detroit.[2] He was hitless in five plate appearances against George Mullin, striking out once. It was Kennedy’s only major league game.

When he returned to Nashville, Dennis Lowney had been signed from Little Rock to play shortstop, and Kennedy took his turn in center field where he played outstanding defense on the outfield hills of Athletic Park.

He made good use of his swiftness in a 7-1 win over New Orleans that kept the Pelicans eight games behind the leading Nashville ball club. Lead-off batter Roy Montgomery socked a long fly ball to right center in the first inning and Kennedy chased after it. Losing his balance just as he grabbed the ball with his glove, he rolled to the ground but held on to rob Montgomery of a sure double.

The Nashville American reported the play with near-poetic expression:

“Kennedy’s catch of Montgomery’s drive in the first inning was a thing of beauty and a source of much joy to the jubilant fans. Sherman fell sprawling on his back upon the bank in right center just as he got his left hand on the sphere, but he clung to the ball, nevertheless. It was a great play.”[3]

Suffering from a knee injury during the middle of the season, Snapper’s stolen base total was reduced to 29. He played in 98 games, hitting .261, and Nashville captured a second-consecutive pennant.

He signed a new contract for the 1903 season, but for whatever reason manager and club-owner Newt Fisher asked Kennedy to approve his being loaned to New Orleans for two weeks to begin the season. Refusing the assignment, on May 30 had two hits in his first two season appearances for Nashville.

“I came to play with Nashville,” said Kennedy, “and I don’t propose to play anywhere else. I like the town and the people. I also like Newt(.) Fisher, and I will be glad to play for him and Nashville, but I will not play in any other city of the Southern League. This is final and absolute.”[4]

But on June 4 he was in New Orleans in an experiment that did not work.  He did not show for the Pelicans game against Birmingham the next day, and on June 6 he shows up as Nashville’s shortstop against Little Rock.

Battling from third place with Memphis and Little Rock ahead in the standings, stealing three bases in a double header with Montgomery on August 12 and two more on August 15, adding a sacrifice against Birmingham.

“Sherman Kennedy has “come back to life.” Sherman is doing his best now and his fast work on the base lines is a joy to the Nashville fans. “Let’s get Kennedy on a base,” is the cry now. Sherman stole two more bases yesterday. If he keeps up this work he will lead the league “a block” in the matter of stolen bases.”[5]

He stole four bases, including a steal of home, and was four-for-four at the plate against Memphis on August 25, fans took up a collection amounting to $32.00 to show appreciation for his specialty work on the base paths. Near season’s end he stole nine bases in 11 games, and finished with a team-best 35 stolen bases (James Smith lead the league with 48, splitting time between Shreveport and New Orleans). Nashville fell to fifth to end the season.

On February 27, 1904, Kennedy arrived in Nashville with his wife and new baby with him. It was the earliest he had shown up to prepare for any season, and Newt Fisher was pleased.

“Manager Fisher and Kennedy spent Saturday at the home of the former, talking over the prospects for the coming season and discussing the players who have been signed. To-day they will be at Athletic Park and will get into uniforms.”[6]

Fisher wanted Sherman to play first base, and he performed admirably at his new position. But the tide turned in a game on June 23 with his club hovering around the .500 mark. Kennedy muffed a throw to first by second baseman Tom Smith. The error was so unlike the agile first sacker that the crowd began to boo.

“There was one of two reasons for Kennedy’s rank error; either he was not able to handle the ball or he dropped it purposely. If it was the first reason, then he is not a fit player for that important position. If it was the second reason, then it is the plain duty of Newt Fisher to put him on the bench and keep him there until he learns what the duty of a ball player is and does not let his temper run away with him…”[7]

The next week Kennedy apologized, and he began to play up to the standard his teammates expected. But on September 17 his father contacted him to say the Kennedy’s young son Frank, who had been ill, was not doing well.

…Kennedy left for his home in Connaught <sic>, O., on a night train, and because of the fact that the season is so nearly over will not return. Kennedy’s child has been seriously ill for some time, and this is no doubt the cause of his indifferent work of late. Other hard luck has also been staring “Ken” in the face for several weeks, and he was almost broken down from the heavy strain on his mind. Kennedy has many friends here who will regret the news of his child’s illness.”

Little Frank soon recovered, and Nashville finished with a 72-67 record, 11 games behind pennant-winning Memphis. Talk began to circulate that Kennedy would sign with New Orleans for 1905. Instead he played for Shreveport where he led the league with 57 stolen bases, tied with 51 sacrifice hits, and batted .290.

For an unknown reason, he did not return to Shreveport until July 11, 1908. The Pirates were in a neck-and-neck battle with New Orleans and Birmingham for the top league spot, and he was immediately inserted into the lineup in a double header with Little Rock. He had two hits and stole a base in the split.

His speed and his bat did not return to him. When the season was over, his batting average had fallen to .189 in 69 games.

Whether another calamity had befallen him is not clear, but his late-season appearance and anemic performance may have spoken for his retirement from baseball.

A 5’10”, 165-lb. switch-hitter, he played all positions except pitcher and catcher for Nashville between 1901-1904. His team won the first two Southern Association championships. “Snapper” had a .292 batting average, and averaged 37 stolen bases in his four seasons with the club.

At the age of 66, he passed away on August 15, 1945 in Pasadena, Texas and is buried at Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery in Houston.

*Author’s note: It appears Sherman Kennedy is often confused with Albert Kennedy; baseball-reference.com shows both players with the same nickname “Snapper”.

SOURCES

Ancestry.com

Baseball-reference.com

Nashville American

Newspapers.com

Retrosheet.org

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[1] 1900 United States Federal Census, accessed November 1, 2016

[2] Lee, Bill. (2003) The Baseball Necrology: The Post-Baseball Lives and Deaths of Over 7,600 Major League Players and Others. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc.

[3] Nashville American, July 16, 1902, p. 6

[4] Nashville American, May 31, 1903, p. 8

[5] Ibid. August 16, 1903, p. 6

[6] Ibid. February 29, 1904, p. 3

[7] Ibid. June 24, 1904, p. 7

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Calling For a Ball Park?

Nashville clubs, desiring to take their game to the mythical four corners of earth to establish hierarchy in the great stadium of sport, issued challenges that were easily accepted. Hopeful for an outcome of superiority, rivals anxiously consented for an opportunity to “vanquish” the opponent.

This was 1870s “base ball”, and challenges came from every club instead of the regular scheduling of games, as who was to know who the best club was without the continual jousting between clubs for superiority:

     The Independent Chick Base Ball Club challenges any club in the city, whose members are 16 years of age, to a match game.

     The North Nashville Club has been challenged by a club, the name of which, owing to the crookedness of the chirography, no fellow can find out.

     The N. Jacobus boys vanquished the G. F. Akers by a score of 17-12, giving them three goose eggs.

     The North Nashville Base Ball Club have cleaned up and leveled their grounds for the battle soon to come off with the Lincks.

     The South Nashvilles are anxious for a chance at the H. Drexlers.[1]

meatball-sepia-fwA cleared lot or field was no longer the acceptable location for a game. “Home field advantage”, became an important draw, and that meant an adequate ball field included considerations for spectators. The safety of crowds, especially in drawing ladies to games, added to the reasoning; to draw a crowd, “cleaned up and leveled” grounds were necessary.

The North Nashville and W. T. Lincks teams were the premier clubs in 1876, and each one’s challenges were not taken lightly. Teams on either side were expected to bat and field with their best ability, but at some point appearance became an important ingredient to a team’s superior class. Whether a part of the arrogance, aristocracy, or patronizing of one club over another, soon all clubs joined in on the regalia:

     The long looked for match of base ball between the noted Lincks and the North Nashvilles will be played to-morrow on the grounds of the North Nashvilles, near Mr. Felix Cheatham’s residence. The game will be called promptly at 3:30, and a large crowd is expected to be on hand, as this game will be the event of the season. Seats will be provided for all, and everybody is cordially invited, the ladies especially. A strong and sufficient force of police will be on duty to preserve order. Both clubs will appear in their new and beautiful uniforms.[2]

Two days later an account of the game, won by the Lincks 12-6, suggested between 2,500 and 3,000 spectators were on hand; about 600 of them were ladies. Eloquent description of the contest allowed for one interjection for the decades to come:

     Never since base ball was introduced have we seen such admirable playing. What a pity we have not a Base Ball Park.[3]

Was this the first call for what would become Nashville’s Athletic Park, affectionately known as Sulphur Dell to future generations?

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[1] Nashville Daily American, August 23, 1876, p. 4

[2] Ibid., August 27, 1876, p. 4

[3] Ibid., August 29, 1876, p. 4

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One Day, Three Wins: Nashville’s 1895 Tripleheader

Rain interfered with Nashville’s home doubleheader with Little Rock on June 25, 1895, as the first game was postponed after three innings when field conditions were too poor to continue. Nashville was leading 2-1, but not enough innings had been played for it to have been a complete game.

George StallingsThe game scheduled for the next day, June 26, was the last visit Little Rock was to have made to Athletic Park for the remainder of the season, creating an unusual circumstance for completing the series. It was the home team’s prerogative to reschedule games, but when Seraphs manager George Stallings decided to play three games in one day to complete the series, the decision did not set well with the visiting team.

Sending word to the opposing club that the first of three games would take place at 10:30 AM, Little Rock’s manager, Richard Gorman, protested to Southern League President J. B. Nicklin that the Travelers should not have to play more than two games in one day. Nicklin did not exactly side with Gorman; he sent a telegram that the choice to play in three games was optional.

Even though Gorman refused to play the morning game, he and two of his players showed up anyway. At game time, umpire Ed Cline yelled “Play ball” and Nashville’s Eddie Daniels toed the rubber. With no batter at the plate, the Nashville pitcher threw three lazy curves to catcher Mike Trost. Cline turned to the 900 spectators and declared the game a 9-0 forfeit in favor of the Seraphs.

When play began in the second game, players from either side had to alternate the umpiring chores for the first three innings as Cline had misunderstood the starting time, set for 2:30 PM.

Nashville committed nine errors but the Seraphs won over Little Rock 17-7. Travelers pitchers Buttons Briggs and Jack Fifield allowed 18 hits, one a home run by Seraphs left fielder Frank Butler, but only seven of the runs were earned.

Sam Moran was the starting pitcher for Nashville. He had a 7-4 record the previous season when the team was known as the Tigers, and would end the season with a 22-12 record. He would become a member of the Pittsburgh Pirates pitching staff at year’s end.

In the middle game of this day, he pitched all nine innings in the two hours it took to lead his team to the win.

The third game of the day was ended after seven innings due to darkness with Nashville having the upper hand, 8-5. Moran was chosen starting pitcher in the final game by manager Stallings. Lackung the speed he possessed in the previous game, Moran gave up only eight hits and two walks as Nashville completed the trifecta.

Atlanta Constitution 06-28-1895 Three Games Triple Header Nashville Little Rock

Nashville remained in third place in the Southern League with the three wins with a 30-18 record, just behind second-place Atlanta (33-17) and league-leading Evansville (33-16). At seasons end, Atlanta secured the pennant with a one-game lead over Nashville. The season was not without problems, as Montgomery, Memphis, and Little Rock did not finish the year.

When the Travelers ball club disbanded in late July, Nashville acquired the contract of Richard Gorman.

Although rare, there are records of other tripleheaders being played. One was played five years earlier on Labor Day, September 1, 1890, between Brooklyn and visiting Pittsburgh. Unlike the Nashville-Little Rock series, all three games were played with no forfeit, with Brooklyn winning 10-9, 3-2, and 8-4.[1]

In 1896, three games were also played in one day. No reason is given, but the tripleheader was played on Labor Day in Baltimore on September 7. The visiting Louisville Colonels lost 4-3, 9-1, and 12-1 with the final game ending after eight innings due to darkness.[2]

Several years would pass before another tripleheader be played. The games were scheduled to determine third-place in the National League, and were the last games of the season. This time, on October 20, 1920, the Cincinnati Reds visited Pittsburgh and won 13-4 and 7-3 before losing 6-0 in a game shortened by darkness. Cincinnati had clinched third place with the first two wins, but the third game was played anyway.[3]

Three games played in one day gave Nashville an uncommon footnote in the history of baseball.

Sources

www.baseball-reference.com

www.newspapers.com

Nashville American

Atlanta Constitution

[1] Suehsdorf, A. D. “The Last Tripleheader”. SABR Research Journal, http://research.sabr.org/journals/last-tripleheader. Accessed June 20, 2016.
[2] Ibid.
[3] Willard, Jim. “Baseball’s last triple-header was certainly one for the record books. http://www.reporterherald.com/ci_19435586. November 30, 2011. Accessed June 16, 2016.

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Hank Aaron’s Professional Debut Was in Sulphur Dell

Henry Aaron was inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1982 after a career that included 25 All-Star appearances, at least a .300 batting mark in 14 seasons, hitting 30 home runs 15 times, and winning three Gold Glove Awards.

Aaron1Most notably renown for becoming baseball’s home run king on April 8, 1974 in passing Babe Ruth with his 715th, Aaron would still have more than 3,000 hits should his total of 755 home runs be removed from his hit total.

“Hammerin’ Hank” captured the National League MVP Award in 1957, won the league’s batting title in 1956 and 1959, and appeared in the World Series in 1957, 1958, and 1969.

Born on February 5, 1934 in Mobile, Alabama, the 18-year-old, 5’11” 170-lb sensation began his march to baseball immortality as a member of the 1952 Negro American League Indianapolis Clowns. The team held spring training in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, then traveled to several cities to play exhibition games between Buffalo and Kansas City.

The Kansas City Monarchs, Chicago American Giants, Birmingham Black Barons, Memphis Red Sox, and Philadelphia Stars were the other teams in the six-team league. The Clowns did not schedule games in Indianapolis, playing all games in other cities, but opening day was scheduled for May 11, 1952 as a double header against the Philadelphia Stars.

In Nashville, at Sulphur Dell. It would be Hank Aaron’s first regular-season game as a professional.

The Memphis World heralded the “newcomer Henry Aaron, the sensational 16 [sic]-year-old, will open at short…”

Memphis World 05-06-1952 Indianapolis Clowns Philadephia Stars Hank Aaron Rookie Sulphur Dell

But the Nashville Tennessean made no mention of Aaron in articles previous to and after the two games:

Tennessean 05-10-1952 Henry Aaron Sulphur Dell Indianapolis Clowns Philadelphia Stars 05-11-1952Tennessean 05-11-1952 Henry Aaron Sulphur Dell Indianapolis Clowns Philadelphia Stars 05-11-1952Tennessean 05-12-1952 Henry Aaron Sulphur Dell Indianapolis Clowns Philadelphia Stars 05-11-1952

With no report of his batting or field totals on that day in the historic ballpark, one can only guess that he began a string of games that included strategic hits and powerful blows that lent to his successful career.

Exactly one month later, on June 11, Aaron was leading the Negro American League with a .483 batting average on 15 hits, 51 total bases, five home runs, six doubles, 28 runs, and 24 RBI. On that day he was purchased by the Boston Braves for $10,000 and his major league career was off and running.

Sent to Eau Claire (Class C – Northern League), he ended his first season in organized baseball with a .336 average. In his first full year in the minors at Jacksonville (Class A – South Atlantic League) in 1953, Hank slammed 22 home runs and had 208 hits leading to a batting average of .362. He earned a trip to spring training where he caught on with the Braves who had left Boston for Milwaukee.

On April 4, 1954, Hank returned to Nashville and had two doubles, scored twice and had two RBI in an 18-14 exhibition win over the Brooklyn Dodgers. At Sulphur Dell one year later against Brooklyn, he hit a home run and a single, driving in two runs in the Dodgers 10-8 win.

In Brooklyn’s 12-2 win the next year on April 9, he had a double and an RBI. It would be four years before Aaron returned to Sulphur Dell, this time against Cincinnati before 6,763 in a 6-3 win over the Reds when he had a single and scored a run.

Aaron’s four appearances in Nashville as a member of the Braves were preceded by a particular date on the baseball calendar, May 11, 1952, when Hammerin’ Hank marked his official professional debut in the infield dirt at Sulphur Dell.

© Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Special thanks to fellow researcher, Mark Aubrey (oldknoxvillebaseball.blogspot.com)

References

Bryant, Howard. (2010). The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron. New York, New York. Pantheon Books.

Vascellaro, Charlie. (2005). Hank Aaron: A Biography. Greenwood. Westport, Connecticut.

Online Sources

http://coe.k-state.edu/annex/nlbemuseum/history/players/aaron.html

http://www.baseball-reference.com

http://www.baseballhall.org

http://www.crossroadstofreedom.org

http://www.georgiaencyclopeia.org

http://www.newspapers.com

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