Tag Archives: Illinois

1940 Nashville Third Baseman Bob Boken

Bob Boken was born in Maryvale, Illinois, February 23, 1908, and proved to be a steady performer for the Vols’ 1940 championship team. Prior to being obtained by Nashville, the 5’ 11” 185-lb. Boken had played pro ball for 10 seasons.

He played for Washington and the Chicago White Sox in 1933 and 1934, having made his major league debut for the Senators on April 25, 1933 against the New York Yankees at Griffith Stadium, substituting for future Hall of Fame shortstop Joe Cronin late in the game.

Boken spent the better part of five seasons with St. Paul (American Association – Class AA). He had socked 21 home runs in 1938 with 19 doubles and four triples for St. Paul, one of his best seasons to date.

He was acquired by Nashville from Louisville (American Association – Class AA) on February 17, 1940. Nashville manager Larry Gilbert felt Boken was exactly what the Vols needed.

“I’ve been trying to get Boken since early last season,” declared Gilbert in announcing the deal. “…is a power hitter, not a “tapritis” hitter…I wanted a right-handed hitter for third base and he should fill the bill perfectly.”[1]

In 1940, Gilbert’s second year of managing the Nashville club, the team won on opening day and never fell below first place the entire rest of the season. Nashville finished the season with a 101-47 (.682) record as Boken and Gus Dugas tied with 118 RBI for the league lead. His season stats included 178 hits, 13 home runs, and a .302 batting average, and he was steady performer at the hot corner.

Boken had a 20-game regular-season hitting streak going until July 11 when he failed to get a hit in the first game of a double header against Atlanta. He probably has his best game of the playoffs in Game 1 against the Houston Buffaloes in the Dixie Series. Playing before 2,698 shivering Sulphur Dell fans, Nashville won 7-5 as Johnny Mihalic, Boken, and pitcher Ace Adams each have two hits apiece.

At the end of the season, Gilbert traded Boken and Mickey Rocco to Buffalo (International League – Class AA) for cash and left-handed hitting Les Fleming. Boken never quite matches his 1940 hitting ability, spending the next seven years with various minor league teams before giving managing a try with Newark (Ohio State League – Class D) in 1946 and El Centro, California (Sunset League – Class C) in 1947.  He  then hung up his spikes.

At the age of 80, he passed away on October 8, 1988 in Las Vegas, and is buried there in Memory Gardens Cemetery.

© 2018 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

SOURCES

Baseball-reference.com

Newspapers.com

Retrosheet.org

 

[1] Raymond Johnson, “New Infielder Power Hitter,” Nashville Tennessean, February 18, 1940, 41.

 

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When a Home Run Isn’t

Consider the plight of poor Bill Bribeck, first baseman of the 1923 Bloomington (Illinois) Bloomers of the Three-I (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa) League. He hit 11 home runs that season, but owns the odd distinction of hitting another six home runs in consecutive games with none going into the score book.

Bloomington’s ball field had a short left field fence, 275 feet from home plate, and on the day after team management erected a five-foot screen on top of it, Bribeck hit a ball near the top of the screen which fell in for a double. A day earlier, it would have been a home run.

In the first inning of the next day’s game, Bill hit a ball that cleared that same left field fence. But the game was rained out in the third inning, negating his second consecutive four-bagger.

He smacked another one out of the park in the third inning on the third day, but as he rounded third base, he missed the bag. The other team noticed, and so did the umpire, and he was called out. With a runner on base on day four he slugged one over the fence, but the runner failed to run in fear of the ball being caught. Bill passed him and was automatically called out.

In game five he hit another home run, but had batted out-of-turn, and his feat was annulled.

shes-outta-here-no-shes-not-fwThe final installment of his misfortune came on the sixth day of an extra-inning affair. It was getting dark, but in the top of the 15th the umpires thought the game would be able to finish. The visitors scored seven runs to take the lead, but with two aboard in the home half Bribick thumped a three-run homer.

His manager, fearing the Bloomers would not be able to pull the game out before complete darkness, began to stall until the umpire finally called the game. The score reverted to the previous inning, a 14-inning tie game. Hard-luck Bill lost his home run, the sixth time on six consecutive days one of his round-trippers was erased.

Similarly, only on a single occasion, one of the Nashville Vols favorite sons suffered the same fate.

Harold “Tookie” Gilbert had all the tools: a good hitter with power, a skillful left-handed first baseman, and youngest son of a baseball family. His father, Larry, played on the 1914 “Miracle” Braves, and became a legend as player-manager of the New Orleans Pelicans and co-owner and manager of the Nashville ball club. Two other sons, Charley and Larry, Jr. had successes of their own in baseball.

Playing for Nashville in 1949 with his father now general manager, Tookie batted .334 and socked 33 home runs, and the next season would find himself on the roster of the New York Giants. But on July 28, 1949 in Nashville’s famous Sulphur Dell, the ballpark that was oddly-shaped with a short right field wall that sat on a hill 22 ½ feet above the playing surface, he lost a home run due to poor judgement by the umpires.

Against Birmingham in the dimly-lit setting, Tookie’s blast off righty Jim McDonald easily cleared the right-center field wall. Center fielder Norm Koney stopped when he saw the ball go over.

But the ball came back onto the field. It had hit a city bus parked outside, rebounded back into the ballpark, and when the three umpires consulted, ruled it a triple.

Seven home runs, each with the same results: Not.

Sources

Baseball-reference.com

Newspapers.com

Author’s note: Much of Bill Bribeck’s story comes from Raymond Johnson’s “One Man’s Opinion” column in the January 22, 1943 edition of the Nashville Tennessean, in which Johnson refers to the original story from the January 1943 edition of Baseball Digest. Also, according to baseball-reference.com Bribeck’s name is “Walter J.”, with no mention of “Bill”.

©2017 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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