Tag Archives: Gene Host

The Up and Down Career of Gene Host

Eugene Earl Host was once one of the highest-rated mound prospects in the Detroit organization.  Born on January 1, 1933 in Leeper, Pennsylvania, the 5′ 11″, 190-pound hard-throwing left hander was signed as a 19-year-old free agent in 1952 by the Detroit Tigers.

Sent to Kingston of the Coastal Plains League in his first professional season, he was 26-7 with a 1.81 ERA and named to the league All Star team.

He spent the 1953 season with Montgomery in the South Atlantic League (A) where he was 10-13 with a 3.51 ERA and in 1954 bounced between three teams: Little Rock (Southern Association – AA), Wilkes-Barre (Eastern League – A), and Durham (Carolina League – B). His combined record was 7-7.

In 1955 he spent the entire season with Little Rock where he was 10-13 once again. In May he hit Chattanooga’s Lyle Luttrell with a pitch, breaking his jaw.

In 1956 he finished 13-15 with Charleston (American Association – AAA) before being called up to the Tigers where his contract with the major league club called for a salary of $4,200.

He pitched in one game for Detroit at Briggs Stadium on September 16, 1956 against Boston. Wearing number 19, he started the game and allowed four runs on nine hits in 4 2/3 innings. Two of those hits were home runs by Billy Klaus (in the 5th inning with one on and one out) and Jackie Jensen (also in the 5th inning, a solo shot with two out).

After a single by Jimmy Piersall and a walk to Norm Zauchin, manager Bucky Harris called on future Hall of Famer Jim Bunning to replace Host on the mound. Bunning won in relief, allowing one hit the rest of the way as the Tigers won 8-4.

On December Host was traded by the Tigers with Wayne Belardi, Ned Garver, Virgil Trucks and $20,000 to the Kansas City Athletics for Jack Crimian, Jim Finigan, Bill Harrington and Eddie Robinson.

Gene HostHost signed with Kansas City at a salary of $5,100 and appeared in 11 games for the Athletics in 1957, mostly in relief. His uniform number was 28. He started two games, at Comiskey Park on April 20 against the Chicago White Sox (his first game for Kansas City, no decision) and at Cleveland Stadium on May 10 against the Indians (his first loss of the season).

His second loss came on June 9 at home at Municipal Stadium. In relief of Tom Morgan with no one out and two on in the fifth inning Host retired the side with no outs. In the eighth he gave up a solo home run to Ted Lepcio. In the ninth inning Jimmy Piersall and Ted Williams hit home runs and Lepcio singled home Jackie Jensen. Boston won 8-4 as Kansas City’s offense gave no support to Host.

On June 14 at Kansas City versus the New York Yankees, Host came on in relief of Mickey McDermott. Facing Mickey Mantle with two out and Bobby Richardson on second, Mantle promptly homered. Finishing the game, Host allowed seven hits, three runs (all earned), and struck out one: Mantle in the ninth.

Host’s final game in the majors was on June 23 at Fenway Park in Boston where he allowed three runs on four hits in 1 1/3 innings.

Traded to Buffalo for Glenn Cox a few weeks later, Host pitched in three games for the Bisons before being obtained by the Denver Bears of the American Association in late July. Under the tutelage of manager Ralph Houk, Denver won their league title. Playing versus Buffalo in the Junior Series championships Host was removed from the 20-player limit but he shared in the players’ share of the winnings.

In September he was sent to Little Rock to end the season. He was 1-4 in five appearances for the Travelers before being assigned back to Buffalo for 1958.

Host never appeared for the Bisons, however, as he was purchased by Indianapolis (American Association – AAA) in April before the season began. Having made his home in Little Rock, he left the club for a week to return to Arkansas without explanation, then rejoined the team on April 24. In May the Indians sent him to San Antonio (Texas League – AA) who returned him to Buffalo in June.

Buffalo assigned him to Winona (Illinois-Indiana-Iowa League – Class B) but he refused to report and was placed on baseball’s suspended list.

Out of baseball in 1959, he returned the next season as a member of the Monterrey Sultans (Mexican League – AA) pitching staff. In the opening game he was the loser in a slugfest in Mexico City in front of 25,000 fans who saw the Reds win 13-8. His record with the Sultans was 2-5 as his ERA ballooned to 5.86.

Host was a member of the Nashville Vols in 1961, signed by the club in March. He appeared in 11 games, winning two and losing five. His first win came against Chattanooga on Monday, April 10 in the second game of the season as Nashville trounced the Lookouts 8-6. By May 3 Birmingham handed him his fourth consecutive defeat, but on May 7 he pitched brilliantly in a four-hit, 2-0 shutout as Nashville’s Gene Davis popped a two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth.

It was Host’s final win of his career. The May 31, 1961 edition of The Sporting News announced his release by Nashville.

Once his baseball career was over he became a bus driver for Continental Trailways, and in 1964 began working as a machinist at the Ford Motor Co. glass plant in Nashville. Host passed away August 20, 1998 at the age of 65 and was cremated.

© 2015 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Two Months in Nashville: Gene Davis

Born in 1934, Gene Davis played amateur baseball for the Jacksonville, Florida Post 9 Generals, one of the premier American Legion programs in the United States.  A third baseman, it was there he garnered attention from scouts for his playing abilities and in 1953 was offered a professional contract with the St. Louis Cardinals.

Upon signing his first contract at the age of 19, Davis was assigned by the parent club to play for Albany, the Cardinals’ Class D entry in the Georgia-Florida League.  It was the beginning of Gene’s minor league career that would last for nine seasons.

In his first professional game with Albany, Davis was hitless at the plate.  Undaunted, he proved his worth by hitting safely in his next 20 games until his streak was halted in a game against Waycross.  On May 19 Davis collected four hits as his team set a single-game Georgia-Florida League record for runs (21) and hits (23).

The 6’ 1”, 185 lb. Davis had minor league stops in Hamilton (PONY), Lynchburg (Piedmont), Peoria (I-I-I), Sioux City (Western), and Winston-Salem (Carolina), all in the Cardinals’ organization.  His best season was in 1954 at Hamilton (Ontario, Canada), where he built a .345 batting average on 173 hits, 62 extra-base hits with 12 home runs, and 270 total bases.

While playing with Hamilton on May 5th against Bradford, Davis’ first inning pop-up bunt was caught by pitcher Dave Zebley who tossed the ball to second base to double up the runner.  The subsequent throw to first caught another runner for the third out and secured the PONY League’s first triple play of the 1953 season.

On May 11, 1954, Gene’s lone hit was enough to break up a no-hit bid by Corning pitcher Bobby Adubato.

With Peoria in 1956, teammates Bob Bauer and Gene Davis both hit home runs in the seventh inning of game on July 15 to defeat Cedar Rapids.  Together again the next season with Winston-Salem, Davis and Bauer duplicated their feat by each socking a home run on June 21, 1957 against the High Point-Thomasville Hi-Toms.

After signing with Washington (AL) after the 1957 season, Davis was assigned to Charlotte (South Atlantic), playing there for two full seasons while splitting 1960 between Charlotte and Wilson (Carolina).

Davis’ debut on South Atlantic League soil got off to a terrific start.  On April 13, 1959 in Charleston, Davis had four hits in five plate appearances with three runs batted in to pace Charlotte to a 12-6 win in front of 2,727 chilly fans on Opening Night.  A few days later on April 17, right fielder Gene slammed two home runs to provide the margin of victory in Charlotte’s 10-9 win over Jacksonville.

A freak single by Davis on May 28 spoiled Asheville pitcher Jack Taylor’s attempt at a no-hitter.  His rap to the mound in the fifth inning struck the pitching rubber and shot into the air.  Before third baseman Don Le John could grab the ball and throw to first base, Davis had safely crossed the bag.  It was the only hit Taylor gave up in winning over Charlotte 4-0.

Davis was named to the 1959 All Star team which faced the Gastonia Pirates in the South Atlantic League All Star Game at Charlotte on July 21.  The 10-inning affair, won by the SALLY All Stars 8-7 with an attendance of 3,593 fans, had originally been scheduled for July 20 but was delayed until the next evening due to rain.

In 1961, the Senators moved to Minneapolis and became the Minnesota Twins, signing a minor league agreement with Nashville of the Southern Association as the Twins’ Class AA affiliate.  Gene joined the Vols as an outfielder and to play third base, his original position when signed by the Cardinals.

On Opening Day in Nashville, April 8th, Vice-President Lyndon Johnson was on hand to throw out the ceremonial first pitch with 5,224 Sulphur Dell fans in attendance.  Senators Estes Kefauver and Albert Gore also attended the game.

Davis did not start, but batted as a pinch hitter for relief pitcher Leverette Spencer in the sixth inning, and reached first base on an error but was promptly lifted for pinch-runner Bill Felker.  Nashville lost the game, 5-3.

In the first game of a double header against Macon at Sulphur Dell on May 7, Macon southpaw Jim Bailey nearly tossed a no-hitter but Nashville ended up winning 2-0 despite Bailey’s gem.  A small crowd of 1,277 watched as Bailey held the Vols hitless for 8 and two-thirds innings before Nashville’s clean-up hitter Joe Christian slapped a curveball just beyond the reach of Macon second baseman George Holder to spoil the no-hit bid.

Still hopeful for a Macon win, Bailey’s efforts were further shattered when Gene poked a waist-high curve for a 280-foot home run over Nashville’s famous right-field fence to seal the 2-0 win for the home team.  Lefty Gene Host got the win by allowing only four hits against the Peaches.

SouAssnBallAlthough Davis had been a consistent mid-teens home run hitter, his statistics had never measured up to his year in Hamilton and during his later seasons his batting average remained close to his minor league career average of .283.

The May 31, 1961 issue of The Sporting News listed under the heading “Deals of the Week” that Gene Davis had been released by Nashville, along with pitchers Gene Host and Al Johnston.

During his two-month stint with the Vols, Davis appeared in 25 games, had 13 hits (including four doubles and two home runs) and a .228 batting average before being released.  At age 27, it was his last professional season.

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Sources

Baseball-Reference.com.

The Sporting News, May 20, 1953, 35.

The Sporting News, May 27, 1953, 36.

The Sporting News, May 19, 1954, 36. 

The Sporting News, September 1, 1954, 11.

The Sporting News, July 25, 1956, 40.

The Sporting News, May 1, 1957, 39.

The Sporting News, April 22, 1959, 30.

The Sporting News, April 29, 1959, 37.

The Sporting News, June 10, 1959, 51.

The Sporting News, July 22, 1959, 40.

The Sporting News, April 19, 1961, 31.

The Sporting News, May 17, 1961, 31.

The Sporting News, May 31, 1961, 37.

Wright, Marshall.  The Southern Association in Baseball 1885-1961.  Jefferson, North Carolina, and London:  McFarland & Company, 2002

Leave a comment

Filed under Biography, History