Tag Archives: Chicago Cubs

Famous Teams, Stars Played Exhibitions at Sulphur Dell on April 4

Major-league ball clubs, training in the southern part of the United States, scheduled exhibition games as they made their way homeward, primarily against minor-league clubs. April 4 was a popular date for such games in Nashville as the teams worked their way toward opening day. Often, the starting lineup consisted of the most famous stars against the hometown team.

In 1906, the Chicago Americans defeated Nashville 6-2 in a game that took 1 hour and 40 minutes. The game was played at Peabody Field due to the wet conditions at Athletic Park. Known as the “hitless wonders”, the White Sox would go on to win the pennant despite having the lowest batting average in the league, then becoming World Series champions by winning four-games-to-two over the Chicago Cubs.

In 1915, the Chicago Cubs defeated the Nashville Vols 7-4 at Sulphur Dell. Cy Williams hits two home runs and the Cubs score three runs in the ninth for the win. Cubs short stop Bob Fisher and brother of former Nashville owner/manager/player, was born in Nashville.

The World Champions New York Yankees paid a visit to Nashville in 1928, falling to the Vols 11-10. Ed Pipgras, brother to the Yankees’ George Pipgras, tossed the last three innings and was the winning pitcher for the Vols. One of his strikeout victims was Babe Ruth, who had a home run in the first inning. Lou Gehrig and Leo Durocher each had a double. The star of the game was Nashville right fielder Wally Hood, who hit a double and home run along with three singles. He was 5-for-5, had a sacrifice fly, drove in two, and scored three runs.

Ruth and the Yankees returned to Sulphur Dell in 1933. With two home runs, New York shut out the Vols, 13-0. Nashville had 23 assists, and only one runner made it to third base. 2,500 fans were in attendance.

In 1942, only 3,500 attend the game at Sulphur Dell as the New York Yankees route the hometown Vols, 10-1. Nashville can muster only six hits, while the Yankees collect a total of 15, including a three-run homer by Don Pulford. Charley English hits a home run in the bottom of the fourth inning off Lefty Gomez for the only run for the host team. The next day, the Yankees win again by a 11-6 score with a barrage of 18 hits as 8,000 fans witness the contest.

In a three-hour, six-minute game played before 12,006 fans in 1954, the Milwaukee Braves defeat the Brooklyn Dodgers, 18-14.  Nine ground-rule doubles are called on balls hit among those seated on the outfield hills. Carl Furillo smacks a grand-slam, and George “Shotgun” Shuba, Duke Snider, and Ed Mathews each hit homers. Roy Campanella pinch-hits and works the last inning behind the plate as Junior Gilliam anchors third and Jackie Robinson plays first.

Two years later, only seven days after Sulphur Dell is under fourteen feet of water, Eddie Mathews hits three home runs to lead the Milwaukee Braves over the Brooklyn Dodgers 10-8. Mathews’ first homer off Don Newcombe is a 340-foot drive over the left field wall. Tom Lasorda relieves in the 9th inning for the Dodgers. Sandy Amoros has two home runs and Hank Aaron also has a homer as Johnny Logan has two doubles and a triple. The Dodgers will go on to win the 1956 National League pennant with a one-game lead over the Braves.

Nashville fans had many opportunites to see baseball’s best and brightest at famous Sulphur Dell.

© 2017 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Research

Cobb to Cubans to Limbless Wonders

The sports page of the March 19, 1910 edition of the Nashville American included a story about exhibition games the Nashville Volunteers would be playing at Sulphur Dell in the weeks to come. Most games were scheduled with major-league clubs: a three-game series each with the Chicago Cubs and Brooklyn, two games each against the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland and Boston of the American League, and a game against Detroit. Buffalo of the Eastern League would visit for a single game on April 9[1].

The array of baseball wonders playing on those teams included future Hall of Famers: Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford of Detroit, Eddie Collins of the Athletics, Frank Chance, Johnny Evers, and Mordecai “Three-Finger” Brown of the Cubs, and Nap Lajoie of Cleveland.

To conclude the exhibition schedule, a game against the visiting Cuban Stars would be held on April 12; the club would be comprised of players from Cuba and possibly other Latin American countries. It is unknown whether the game had been scheduled as a curiosity, or as a slow down to the quality of play afforded major-league teams before Nashville delved into the Southern Association season.

With some uncertainty, it appears this visiting Cuban club was formed in 1899 by Cuban baseball magnate Abel Linares, taking on the name “Cuban Stars” in 1905[2]. The March 1 edition of the Chicago Daily Tribune reported a letter had been received from Linares the previous day stating his club would “sail for the states right after the close of the Cuban season on April 28”[3]. However, a team of “Cuban Stars” did arrive in New Orleans on March 31.[4]

For whatever reason, the game did not take place. Sports writer Allen Johnson of the American felt the fans had their fill of the special preseason games, and chose to report a special event that would take its place: boxing, on April 11. But not just any boxing.

Matches were scheduled “among the representatives of the colored race strictly”. The main event was to include “Kid” Ditmore, and “Kid” Dilihaunty; but almost eerily, there was mentioned a bout between “two old-time black fighters, each of whom now has but one leg.”[5]

Johnson’s account, under the heading “Clever Bouts in the Dell”, stated 1,500 people attended the fight and “some good bouts were put up by the dark fight fans of this city”. In the best satire he could muster regarding the one-legged pugilists, he wrote “This fight was very amusing while it lasted, but Chambers gave out in the second round”.

To add insult to injury, Johnson describes the participants as “limbless wonders”. Even though it was a sign of the times, it could be argued that this was an example of how quality sports reporting degenerated in only a few days into a wonder of its own.

© 2017 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[i] Nashville American, March 18, 1910, p. 5.

[2] Burgos, Adrian (2011). Cuban Star: How One Negro-League Owner Changed the Face of Baseball. New York: Hill and Wang.

[3] Chicago Daily Tribune, March 1, 1910, p. 15.

[4] Hartford Courant, April 5, 1910, p. 14.

[5] Nashville American, April 11, 1910, p. 8.

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Opinion, Research

Nashville’s Swift Sherman Kennedy

Sherman Montgomery Kennedy was born in Conneaut, Ohio on November 13, 1877. His father, Benjamin, was a real estate agent, and his mother, Clara, was a homemaker. By the time his three sisters were in school and his brother was a farm hand, Sherman had already made his name in baseball.[1]

Little is known of his early playing days, but by 1899 he joined the New London Whalers in the Connecticut League, hitting for a .244 average while playing third base and outfield, and pitching to a 7-6 record in 14 games. He played only a few games for New London in 1900, but Kennedy began the inaugural Southern Association season in 1901 at short stop.

In the opening game in Chattanooga on May 2, he reached on an error, scored a run, and made an error while making a putout with three assists in the field. Nashville won in 10 innings, 15-14; the next day he dropped from seventh to eighth in the lineup but gathered his first hit on a single as his team won its second game 6-4.

By mid-season, he had moved to first in the batting order to take advantage of his speed. Nashville ended the season 78-45 to capture the flag; Kennedy ended the year with 50 stolen bases and was reportedly off to the major leagues.

snapper_kennedy_fbBefore re-joining Nashville for 1902, the 23-year-old played center field for the Chicago Orphans (now the Cubs) on May 1 against Detroit.[2] He was hitless in five plate appearances against George Mullin, striking out once. It was Kennedy’s only major league game.

When he returned to Nashville, Dennis Lowney had been signed from Little Rock to play shortstop, and Kennedy took his turn in center field where he played outstanding defense on the outfield hills of Athletic Park.

He made good use of his swiftness in a 7-1 win over New Orleans that kept the Pelicans eight games behind the leading Nashville ball club. Lead-off batter Roy Montgomery socked a long fly ball to right center in the first inning and Kennedy chased after it. Losing his balance just as he grabbed the ball with his glove, he rolled to the ground but held on to rob Montgomery of a sure double.

The Nashville American reported the play with near-poetic expression:

“Kennedy’s catch of Montgomery’s drive in the first inning was a thing of beauty and a source of much joy to the jubilant fans. Sherman fell sprawling on his back upon the bank in right center just as he got his left hand on the sphere, but he clung to the ball, nevertheless. It was a great play.”[3]

Suffering from a knee injury during the middle of the season, Snapper’s stolen base total was reduced to 29. He played in 98 games, hitting .261, and Nashville captured a second-consecutive pennant.

He signed a new contract for the 1903 season, but for whatever reason manager and club-owner Newt Fisher asked Kennedy to approve his being loaned to New Orleans for two weeks to begin the season. Refusing the assignment, on May 30 had two hits in his first two season appearances for Nashville.

“I came to play with Nashville,” said Kennedy, “and I don’t propose to play anywhere else. I like the town and the people. I also like Newt(.) Fisher, and I will be glad to play for him and Nashville, but I will not play in any other city of the Southern League. This is final and absolute.”[4]

But on June 4 he was in New Orleans in an experiment that did not work.  He did not show for the Pelicans game against Birmingham the next day, and on June 6 he shows up as Nashville’s shortstop against Little Rock.

Battling from third place with Memphis and Little Rock ahead in the standings, stealing three bases in a double header with Montgomery on August 12 and two more on August 15, adding a sacrifice against Birmingham.

“Sherman Kennedy has “come back to life.” Sherman is doing his best now and his fast work on the base lines is a joy to the Nashville fans. “Let’s get Kennedy on a base,” is the cry now. Sherman stole two more bases yesterday. If he keeps up this work he will lead the league “a block” in the matter of stolen bases.”[5]

He stole four bases, including a steal of home, and was four-for-four at the plate against Memphis on August 25, fans took up a collection amounting to $32.00 to show appreciation for his specialty work on the base paths. Near season’s end he stole nine bases in 11 games, and finished with a team-best 35 stolen bases (James Smith lead the league with 48, splitting time between Shreveport and New Orleans). Nashville fell to fifth to end the season.

On February 27, 1904, Kennedy arrived in Nashville with his wife and new baby with him. It was the earliest he had shown up to prepare for any season, and Newt Fisher was pleased.

“Manager Fisher and Kennedy spent Saturday at the home of the former, talking over the prospects for the coming season and discussing the players who have been signed. To-day they will be at Athletic Park and will get into uniforms.”[6]

Fisher wanted Sherman to play first base, and he performed admirably at his new position. But the tide turned in a game on June 23 with his club hovering around the .500 mark. Kennedy muffed a throw to first by second baseman Tom Smith. The error was so unlike the agile first sacker that the crowd began to boo.

“There was one of two reasons for Kennedy’s rank error; either he was not able to handle the ball or he dropped it purposely. If it was the first reason, then he is not a fit player for that important position. If it was the second reason, then it is the plain duty of Newt Fisher to put him on the bench and keep him there until he learns what the duty of a ball player is and does not let his temper run away with him…”[7]

The next week Kennedy apologized, and he began to play up to the standard his teammates expected. But on September 17 his father contacted him to say the Kennedy’s young son Frank, who had been ill, was not doing well.

…Kennedy left for his home in Connaught <sic>, O., on a night train, and because of the fact that the season is so nearly over will not return. Kennedy’s child has been seriously ill for some time, and this is no doubt the cause of his indifferent work of late. Other hard luck has also been staring “Ken” in the face for several weeks, and he was almost broken down from the heavy strain on his mind. Kennedy has many friends here who will regret the news of his child’s illness.”

Little Frank soon recovered, and Nashville finished with a 72-67 record, 11 games behind pennant-winning Memphis. Talk began to circulate that Kennedy would sign with New Orleans for 1905. Instead he played for Shreveport where he led the league with 57 stolen bases, tied with 51 sacrifice hits, and batted .290.

For an unknown reason, he did not return to Shreveport until July 11, 1908. The Pirates were in a neck-and-neck battle with New Orleans and Birmingham for the top league spot, and he was immediately inserted into the lineup in a double header with Little Rock. He had two hits and stole a base in the split.

His speed and his bat did not return to him. When the season was over, his batting average had fallen to .189 in 69 games.

Whether another calamity had befallen him is not clear, but his late-season appearance and anemic performance may have spoken for his retirement from baseball.

A 5’10”, 165-lb. switch-hitter, he played all positions except pitcher and catcher for Nashville between 1901-1904. His team won the first two Southern Association championships. “Snapper” had a .292 batting average, and averaged 37 stolen bases in his four seasons with the club.

At the age of 66, he passed away on August 15, 1945 in Pasadena, Texas and is buried at Forest Park Lawndale Cemetery in Houston.

*Author’s note: It appears Sherman Kennedy is often confused with Albert Kennedy; baseball-reference.com shows both players with the same nickname “Snapper”.

SOURCES

Ancestry.com

Baseball-reference.com

Nashville American

Newspapers.com

Retrosheet.org

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[1] 1900 United States Federal Census, accessed November 1, 2016

[2] Lee, Bill. (2003) The Baseball Necrology: The Post-Baseball Lives and Deaths of Over 7,600 Major League Players and Others. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc.

[3] Nashville American, July 16, 1902, p. 6

[4] Nashville American, May 31, 1903, p. 8

[5] Ibid. August 16, 1903, p. 6

[6] Ibid. February 29, 1904, p. 3

[7] Ibid. June 24, 1904, p. 7

Leave a comment

Filed under Biography, History, Research

Early Exhibitions Led to a Working Agreement with Chicago Cubs

On October 11, 1951, when the Nashville club signs a working agreement with the New York Giants, it ends a long association with the Chicago Cubs. Upon Larry Gilbert’s arrival in the southern city, in 1939 he continued owner Fay Murray’s working agreement with the Brooklyn Dodgers through the 1942 season, and signed his club on with the Chicago. Gilbert was even considered to manage or coach the Cubs

But the relationship goes back much further than that. In 1885 Cap Anson brought his Chicago White Stockings (often called Anson’s Colts) to Nashville. On April 10, his club wins over Nashville’s professional team 4-2 before 4,000 fans.

In 1903 the Chicago baseball team would become the Cubs. As early as 1908 the National League team visited Nashville for a series of exhibition games that continued for another 10 years.

In front of 3,500 in attendance at Sulphur Dell on April 6, 1908, the Cubs are victorious over Nashville 7-0. Chick Fraser holds the Vols to two hits, both by Doc Wiseman. The next day, the Cubs beat Nashville as Chicago pitcher Carl Lundgren holds the Vols to two hits once again, this time for a 7-2 win.

The famous “Tinkers-to-Evers-to-Chance” combination has one double play in the game.

Coming off their 1908 World Series victory over the Detroit Tigers, the Cubs visited Nashville once again, this time to play a late-March three-game series. Manager Bill Bernhardt’s Vols lost all three by scores of 3-0, 3-0, and 11-2. Boston Red Sox players attended the game as both major league squads had set up camp in Nashville (the Red Sox won 9-2 on April 1 and 10-2 the following day.)

In 1910, on March 28 and 29, Nashville loses by consecutive 3-1 scores. In the third game, the Vols have 10 hits against Chicago starting pitcher and future Hall of Famer Three-Finger Brown and reliever Orval Overall but lose 9-2.

Settling in Nashville once again for two exhibition games at Sulphur Dell in 1911, the Cubs takes game over the Vols, 8-4, 8-2 on March 28 and 29.

On March 24, 1912, the Vols continue their losing streak to the Cubs, 6-3. In the second inning against Nashville-born pitcher Fred Toney, Vols catcher Rowdy Elliott socked a long home run that cleared the Sulphur Dell fence by 10 feet and is considered only the second home run off a right-handed pitcher ever hit in the fabled ballpark.

Scoring four runs in the ninth inning on March 24, 1915, the Cubs win over the Vols 4-2 even though the big leaguers committed three errors. Breaking a habit of losing to Chicago, Nashville wins 3-1 on March 25, 1913, as a fist-fight ensues between Heinie Zimmerman of the Cubs and umpire Hadley Williams. Zimmerman was peeved at the way the Vols were hitting pitcher Lew Richie.

On March 24, 1914, Nashville loses to the Cubs by a score of 2-0, and the next year lose again 7-4 on April 4 as Cy Williams has two home runs for the visitors including an inside-the-park homer.sporting-life-march-10-1917-chicago-cubs-nashville-vols-agreement

Williams has another home run on April 7, 1915, along with Cubs outfielder Frank Schulte, in a 12-1 win over Nashville at Sulphur Dell. Vols third baseman Johnny Dodger has two errors and the Cubs outhit Nashville 17-5 in Chicago’s win.

It appears the two clubs did not play each other during 1916, but a new agreement that include the Cubs was on the horizon. On February 6, 1917, having broken off talks with the St. Louis Browns, it was expected the Nashville Baseball Club will sign a working agreement with the Chicago Cubs. On March 6, a working agreement was announced with the Chicago Cubs whereby the major league club would provide an infielder, outfielder, and pitcher each season.

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

SOURCES

baseball-reference.com

newspapers.com

Paper of Record

sabr.org

Leave a comment

Filed under History, Research

Nashville’s Short-lived Affiliation with the Brooklyn Dodgers

Branch Rickey was known as a shrewd business manager, building a farm system within the St. Louis Cardinals organization beginning in the late 1920s. His skill in unifying teams under the Cardinals umbrella was the model for the growing minor leagues.

He purchased several minor league clubs on his own which would later give him greater control in the managing the entire structure of the classification system.

Under his front office tutelage the Cardinals won six National League championships and four World Series titles. After his final championship season in St. Louis in 1942, Rickey moved to the position of general manager with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Before he assumed control of the Dodgers, Nashville had already been in Brooklyn’s minor league fold. Recent affiliation agreements with the New York Giants and Cincinnati Reds had been set aside in 1938 when Nashville and Brooklyn consolidated their farm clubs to match the success that Rickey had maintained in making the Cardinals one of the most successful baseball clubs of the 1930s.

brooklyn_dodgers_fbUnder the arrangement, Nashville’s close relationships with Pensacola, Tallahassee, and Fulton (Kentucky) clubs would join Brooklyn’s interests in Elmira (New York), Winston-Salem, Clinton (Iowa), Dayton, and Greenwood (Mississippi). Two additional clubs were to join in the agreement, giving the Dodgers a 10-team minor league affiliation.

The alliance was negotiated by Nashville manager Chuck Dressen (who would later become Dodgers manager), Vols owner Fay Murray and business manager Jimmy Hamilton, Brooklyn general manager Larry MacPhail and manager Burleigh Grimes.

Larry MacPhail was a former resident of Nashville where his son Lee MacPhail was born. Both MacPhails are in the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the only father-son members inducted into the shrine.

Dressen would be spending extended time in the Dodgers’ spring camp to evaluate talent and to assess the best available for Nashville from 250 players. Vols camp was to begin on March 10 in Tallahassee, while the Dodgers would train in Clearwater.

Nashville would finish in second place in the Southern Association for 1938 and MacPhail added Dressen to Leo Durocher’s staff in Brooklyn for the 1939 season. The move paved the way for Vols owner Fay Murray to offer Larry Gilbert the managerial position and an ownership stake in the Nashville club if he would leave New Orleans.

Gilbert left the Pelicans and promptly led Nashville to third place, a league playoff win, and the Southern Association’s representative in the Dixie Playoffs to face Ft. Worth.

The Dodgers-Vols agreement ended after 1940 and a Southern Association and Dixie Playoff win for the Vols. Nashville entered an association with the Chicago Cubs and continued to succeed under Larry Gilbert with additional league championships in 1941 and 1942 and Dixie Playoff championships in 1941, 1942, and 1948 before Gilbert retired.

Branch Rickey’s successful minor league venture paved the way for all major league clubs in the controlling of player development. Nashville’s foundation for successful seasons began with an agreement with the Dodgers that was modeled on Rickey’s formula.

© 2015 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Filed under History

Another “Moonlight” Moment: Garth Mann

Moonlight3Many of us know the story of Archibald “Moonlight” Graham: he appeared in one game with the New York Giants in 1905 but never made an appearance at the plate. His character was immortalized by actor Burt Lancaster in the classic movie Field of Dreams.

Did you know there was a similar occurrence, this time with a Nashville connection?

Benjamin Garth “Red” Mann was a 6’0″, 155-lb right-handed pitcher who worked his way from Class D ball in Rayne, Louisiana in 1937 to the A-1 classification team in Knoxville by 1942. After World War II he was placed on the major league roster of the Chicago Cubs to begin the 1944 season.

On May 14, 1944, in the second game of a double header against the Brooklyn Dodgers, Cubs manager Charlie Grimm inserted Mann as a pinch runner for left fielder Lou Novikoff, who had singled. Mann took third on a double by Bill Nicholson, and scored on Andy Pafko’s single.

GMannCubs

Sixs day later on May 20th, Garth Mann was sent to Nashville. For the remainder of the Vols season he was 7-7 with a 4.88 ERA. During the next few years he would make it to Triple-A with Oakland, Sacramento, and Seattle before retiring in 1949; his pitching record was 114-86 with a 3.53 ERA over 11 minor league seasons.

Today is Garth Mann’s birthday, born on November 16, 1915 in Brandon, Texas. He passed away September 11, 1980 in Waxahachie, Texas at the age of 64.

May 14, 1944 was Mann’s only appearance in a major league game and like “Moonlight” Graham, did not make a plate appearance. It’s a less famous story, of course, but at least Mann scored a run and “Moonlight” Graham did not.

I wonder who would best portray Mann in his “Field of Dreams” story?

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

1 Comment

Filed under Biography, History, Research

Ernie Banks: Remembering Sulphur Dell

During Hall of Famer Ernie Banks’ recent visit to Nashville, he recalled playing at Sulphur Dell for the Kansas City Monarchs. Banks was on the Negro League team during the 1950 and 1953 seasons (he served in the military during 1951-1952).

“Do you remember the date?” I asked him.

“I believe it would have been 1953, but I can’t tell you what month. I do remember hitting a fly ball up on the hill in right field,” he responded.

Knowing that it would not have been entirely unusual for there to be an announcement about a Negro League game in one of Nashville’s mainstream newspapers, previous research told me that it would be unusual for the game to have been reported in the sports section.

Nor would there be a chance of a box score or any other information to have been printed.

“I’d like to find a box score or some other reference to the game”, I said. “Any thing you could remember about playing here would be helpful.”

I did not want Banks to think he was being interrogated, but experience told me that it might be helpful if he could remember which team was the Monarchs’ opponent for the game.

“Do you remember what team you were playing?” I asked.

Banks thought for a moment, looking straight at me as if he was really wanting to remember any clue he had about the game.

“I believe we were playing the Indianapolis Clowns,” he said. “If you find anything, let me know.”

Hoping I could find some reference to Ernie Banks playing with the Monarchs in Nashville, another research quest was added to my list. Perhaps some reference to a Monarchs game at Sulphur Dell could be found.

I found it. At least, I believe I did. After searching various resources I found a reference to the Kansas City Monarchs playing the Indianapolis Clowns in Nashville. It is only a small write-up and line score of a Negro League game played on August 7 – Banks is not mentioned – but nevertheless there it was. It is from the Kansas City Times, August 8, 1953:

Kansas City Times, August 8, 1953

Often it only takes a tidbit of information (and a little bit of diligence, too) to find that hidden gem. To me, it is about connecting our present to our past, and any tip, hint, or clue whets my appetite for helping to make that connection.

Since Ernie Banks recalled that the Monarchs played the Clowns, it made the difference. I hope to contact him and with the information in the article and perhaps it will produce new memories about his visit to Nashville’s Sulphur Dell.

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Leave a comment

Filed under Biography, Current, History, Negro League, Research