Tag Archives: Casey Stengel

Aubrey Gatewood Pitched for Nashville in 1963

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Provided by Tony Roberts

Aubrey Lee Gatewood was born November 17, 1938 in Little Rock, Arkansas. His father, Lee, was a truck driver in building construction, his mother Gladys was a homemaker, and when he was born there were three older sisters: Betty, Dolpha, and Delores.

He attended North Little Rock High School, tossed a perfect game in an American Legion game in 1956[1], and played for legendary coach J. A. “Ike” Tomlinson at Arkansas State University for three years[2]. On June 12, 1959, he signed a contract with cthe Detroit Tigers as a free agent and was to become a member of the Birmingham Barons club of the Southern Association but did not play that season.[3]

He was assigned to Durham (Carolina League – Class B) in 1960 and was 2-3 with a 6.50 ERA before being shipped to the Duluth-Superior Dukes (Northern League – Class C) where he finished the year 9-5 with a 2.35 ERA and 102 strikeouts in 95 innings. At one point, he accomplished six consecutive victories.[4] In a playoff game against Minot in September, he was removed from a game after being hit by a line drive.[5]

On December 14, he was selected by the expansion Los Angeles Angels from Detroit as the 11th pick for $75,000.

He began the 1961 season with hopes of earning a roster spot with the Angels. Catcher Del Rice, who had 16 years of experience handling pitchers, assessed Gatewood’s talent in spring training at Palm Springs, California.

“He’s got a good fastball and curve, but will also need a lot of work.”[6]

When the St. Louis Cardinals sold pitcher Ron Kline to the Angels, Gatewood was sent to Dallas-Ft. Worth (American Association – Class AA).[7] After losing two games in six appearances for the Rangers, he was demoted to Portsmouth-Norfolk (South Atlantic League – Class A) and his poor showing continued. In seven games, he had no wins and three loses.

Optioned to Des Moines (Illinois-Indiana-Iowa League – Class B), he filled in quickly as a starter in 11 games in 13 appearances. He picked up his strikeout pace with 89 strikeouts in 75 innings with a 3-5 record and 5.04 ERA.

In October when Angels general manager Fred Haney called up six players from Dallas-Ft. Worth, he returned Gatewood to the Rangers from Des Moines.[8]

On November 27 in the 1961 Rule 5 draft, Gatewood was chosen by the New York Mets for $25,000 (he I s the only player selected in both expansion drafts). [9]He had recently moved his residence from Little Rock to Los Angeles in anticipation of remaining with the Angels.

Mets manager Casey Stengel was unhappy with Aubrey’s control and was returned to the Angels on April 6, 1962.[10] In his best Stengelese rationale, “The Old Perfessor” told Gatewood, “Son, we’d like to keep you around this season, but we’re going to try to win a pennant.”[11]

Assigned to Hawaii (Pacific Coast League – Class AAA), in 20 games he was 6-8 with a 4.54 ERA but was leading the league with 72 walks when he was sent to Tri-City (Northwest League – Class B) to end the season. He won one game and lost three and his ERA ballooned to 10.29.

Nashville, without professional baseball during the 1962 season after 61 years in the now-defunct Southern Association, reorganized in the Class A SALLY League and the Angels signed the Vols on as an affiliate. On April 3 Gatewood was assigned there under manager John Fitzpatrick who had managed Angels affiliate in Quad Cities (Midwest League – Class D) the previous year.

He was being counted on to anchor the starting rotation.

“(Gatewood) will probably be our starting pitcher in the opening game at Knoxville”, touted Vols general manager Ed Doherty. “He can fire. I saw him work four innings the other day and he struck out seven and walked but one. He’s got a good, live arm.”[12]

On April 19, in Nashville’s opening game in Knoxville, Gatewood was the starter. He pitched five innings with no decision as the Vols won 8-4. He was removed from the game after giving up five hits and two runs, but Fitzpatrick pulled him not for being ineffective but for sitting through three rain delays.[13]

In the second game of a double header with Macon on April 29, Fitzpatrick was ejected from arguing a close play at third, and Gatewood was called on to guide the club for the remainder of the game.[14]

Chronic arm trouble haunted him during the season, and twice he was flown to Los Angeles for a medical examination. Bone chips in his throwing elbow were the issue, and both diagnosis resulted in him being sent back to Nashville without surgery. Doctors felt he could be treated with occasional cortisone shots. [15]

However, he was chosen to play in the South Atlantic League All Star game played in Augusta on July 22, where he tossed two innings of hitless relief, striking out three in the All Stars’ whitewashing of the first-half champion Yankees 7-0.

After his second return in August, he did not win another game.[16]

 ““He had a huge curveball,” says 1963 Nashville Vols historian Tony Roberts watched him from behind the plate, “but his arm issues kept him from dominating hitters.”

“Without rehabilitation like the players receive today, Gatewood just never recovered.”[17]

He had a 6-10 record with a 3.34 ERA for the Vols before being called up by the Angels on September 5, and on September 11 pitched a four-hitter in a 4-1 complete game win over the Red Sox in his major-league debut. He finished 1-1 with a 1.50 ERA in four games.

At the beginning of 1964 spring training in Phoenix, he hopes of becoming a starter for the Angels. Los Angeles Times sports writer John Hall explained how Gatewood had come to the club nearly unnoticed.

“Gatewood’s career has been detoured in the past by arm miseries, but he indicated last September that he’s got the hex licked and he’s been taking it slow and sensible this spring, just now ready to make his move to become a starter in the Angel rotation that will include Ken McBride, Dean Chance, Bo Belinsky and Barry Latman.”[18]

But he was sent to Hawaii to begin the season; and was the Islanders starting pitcher in a spring exhibition against the parent club. After 17 starts, a 5-7 record, and 5.12 ERA for Hawaii, he was recalled by the Angels in July. He made seven starts and eight relief appearances, ending with a 3-3 record and a respectable 2.24 ERA.

His third loss came on September 16 against the New York Yankees when he walked Bobby Richardson in the sixth inning, and Roger Maris slugged a home run for his 1,000th career hit.

The Angels kept Aubrey on the major-league roster for the entire 1965 season, although when they sent him to their Seattle farm club during spring training, he threatened to quit[19]. To alleviate pressure on his arm, he became a knuckleball pitcher. Los Angeles Times writer Hall reported the change in delivery.

“Aubrey Gatewood’s knuckler has become the talk of the clubhouse, and the angry man from Arkansas is smiling for the first time all season.

“I can throw strikes with it and that’s the name of the game,” said Gatewood.”[20] His year ended at 4-5 and a 3.42 ERA in 92 innings.

1966 was not so kind to him. He began with El Paso (Texas League – Class AA) and was 2-6 with a 4.97 ERA as a spot starter and middle reliever before being purchased by Buffalo (International League – Class AAA), a Cincinnati farm club where he had a 6-7 record and a 5.67 ERA.

He continued his stay in Buffalo throughout 1967. He appeared in 37 games, winning four and losing five. His ERA was 3.80.

Before the 1968 season began, he was sent to Baltimore, a team which had envied his services in 1965[21]. He pitched for the Oriole’s Rochester (International League – Class AAA) club, but with a 4-10 record and ERA of 4.20, he was removed from the Red Wings roster in July and awaited reassignment.[22]

His reassignment was to Tacoma (Pacific Coast League – Class AAA), on loan to the Chicago Cubs affiliate. He was 1-1, pitched 39 innings in 11 games, and started in four.

Back with Rochester again in 1969, he pitched four innings in two games before being released in May. On June 20, 1969, he signed as a Free Agent with the Atlanta Braves and sent to Shreveport (Texas League – Class AA), where he was 7-6.

After getting a call to the Braves from Shreveport in June of 1970, he pitched two innings in three games for Atlanta. His last major-league appearance came on July 8 against the San Francisco Giants, before being sent to Richmond (International League – Class AA) a few days later. He played in five games for Richmond, and ended his season back in Shreveport.

He never overcame his loss of arm strength or his ability to overpower hitters. Gatewood’s major league career lasted for four seasons, and he finished 8-9 with a 2.78 ERA for Los Angeles and the Atlanta Braves.

After one final season, split between Savannah and Arkansas in the Dixie Association, he retired in 1971. His career included a minor-league career record of 61-90 and 4.36 ERA.

SOURCES

Ancestry.com

Baseball-reference.com

Newspapers.com

Retrosheet.org

Sabr.org

Writer’s note: Special thanks to Tony Roberts for providing newspaper clippings and other information about Gatewood’s season in Nashville.

© 2016 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

[1] Pittsburgh Courier, January 11, 1964, p. 15

[2] Decatur (Illinois) Herald, January 11, 1971, p. 17

[3]Battle Creek Inquirer, June 30, 1959, p. 14

[4] Eau Claire Daily Telegram, August 1, 1960, p. 11

[5] St. Cloud Times, September 7, 1960, p. 26

[6]Long Beach Independent, March 27, 1961, p. 19

[7] Ibid., April 11, 1961, p. 18

[8] Los Angeles Times, October 17, 1961, p. 79

[9] Long Beach Independent, July 31, 1964, p. 37

[10] Des Moines Register, April 15, 1962, p. 45

[11] Stewart, Wayne. (2012) The Little Red Book of Baseball Wisdom (Little Red Books). New York, New York: Skyhorse Publishing.

[12] Nashville Tennessean, April 4, 1963, p. 31

[13] Ibid., April 20, 1963, p. 13

[14] Ibid., April 30, 1963, p. 15

[15] Ibid., August 14, 1963, p. 20

[16] Ibid., September 12, 1963, p. 23

[17] Telephone conversation with Roberts November 17, 2016

[18] Hall, John. “Gatewood to Success”. Los Angeles Times, March 24, 1964

[19] Los Angeles Times, April 1, 1965, p. 46

[20] Hall. September 12, 1965.

[21] Long Beach Independent, June 7, 1965, p.  25

[22] Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, July 27, 1968, p. 33

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It Happened on This Day in Nashville: April 7

This day holds a special place in the history of Nashville baseball, and includes exhibitions between the hometown Vols and various major league clubs, a regret from baseball’s iconic Babe Ruth, and a rare perfect game:

April 7, 1904
Nashville and Boston of the National League meet at Athletic Park as the major leaguers win 8-3.

April 7, 1925
The Chicago White Sox win over the Nashville Vols 12-6. It is the 16th consecutive spring training game for the major league club in as many days.

April 7, 1927
The 65th General Assembly of Tennessee adjourns early to see Babe Ruth and the New York Yankees play the St. Louis Cardinals at Sulphur Dell. A resolution had been adopted to invite Ruth to address the Senate, but he sent word that it would be impossible for him to appear because of a lack of time.  The Cardinals beat the Yankees 10-8 in a rematch of the 1926 World Series clubs.

April 7, 1934
Charles Dressen’s Vols wins against the New York Yankees 5-4 in a game at Sulphur Dell. Before a crowd of 3,000, the Yankees are stymied by the pitching of Hal Stafford, who relieved in the 5th inning and allows only four hits through the last five innings, striking out five.

James P. Dawson, New York Times reporter, describes Sulphur Dell’s unique feature as “the right field here is cut out of a hill and is terraced, making it necessary for a fly-chaser to combine hill-climbing ability with speed and accuracy in fielding the ball“. Dawson also reports that Babe Ruth “almost broke one of his legs catching (Bill) Rodda’s fly on the climb in the first. The Babe slipped and stumbled but climbed on and came up with the ball“. Ruth is two for four, as is Lou Gehrig.

April 7, 1953
Mickey Mantle hits a 420-foot two-run double in the seventh inning as the New York Yankees beat the hometown Vols 9-1 before 2,693 fans. Louis Effrat, reporting in The New York Times, quotes one Yankee player as describing playing in Sulphur Dell as “It’s like playing in a telephone booth“, and quoted Casey Stengel, New York manager, recalling that in 1912 when he was playing with Montgomery in a game at Sulphur Dell, “I dragged the ball and it went over the right-field fence for a homer“.Turner_1953

Yankee pitching coach Jim Turner, a native of Nashville, is honored at home plate before the game by Governor Frank G. Clement who appointed Turner a Tennessee Colonel on the Governor’s staff.

April 7, 1957
The Cincinnati Reds defeat Washington 9-7 before 5,842 fans after the Nats lose a 5-0 lead. Joe Nuxhall, Hal Jeffcoat and Raul Sanchez pitch for the Reds, while Roy Sievers belts a triple and homer, driving in three runs. Herb Plews and Pete Runnels get two hits each for Washington.

April 7, 2003
Right-hander John Wasdin pitches the first perfect game in Nashville Sounds history in his first start of the season against the Albuquerque Isotopes.  The 4–0 win is only the second nine-inning perfect game in PCL history.

In ten days a new era begins: April 17th is Opening Night for the Nashville Sounds at new First Tennessee Park near the site of famous Sulphur Dell!

© 2015 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Nashville’s Jim Turner: Player, Coach, Manager, Fan

Born in August 6, 1903 in Antioch, Tennessee, James “Jim” Riley Turner began his journey in baseball in March of 1922. Trying out for the hometown Nashville Vols as a catcher in the presence of manager Larry Doyle, pitcher Red Lucas, outfielder Mike Burke, and third baseman Hap Morse, Turner was told “come back next year”. He spent the rest of the year playing semipro ball in the Nashville area.

Turner’s brother Bryant was usually the pitcher on their teams, and when Bryant failed to show up for a game for Nolensville, Jim pitched the game and struck out 18 Gladeville batters. He was a pitcher from that time on. One of the spectators told Little Rock manager Kid Elberfeld about Turner and on the team’s next visit to Nashville Little Rock signed him to a contract for $175 a month.

In March Little Rock sent Turner to Paris, Tennessee in the Kitty League where he played in 1923 and 1924. He won 14 games the first year and 16 games the next. Sent to Winston-Salem in 1925, for the next five seasons Turner had stops in Greensboro, Portsmouth, Norfolk, Selma, and back to Greensboro. During the winter of 1929-1930, Turner was sold to Hollywood in the Pacific Coast League where he played for three seasons. He spent four seasons in Indianapolis winning 18 games in 1936.

He had spent 14 years in the minor leagues before his break into major league ball when he was sold to the Boston Braves. As a 32-year-old rookie in 1937, Turner won 20 games, had a National League-best ERA of 2.38, led the league in shutouts with five and complete games with 24. The next season he was selected to the 1938 National League All Star team. Two years later he pitched in the 1940 World Series for the Cincinnati Reds. In 1942 he spent part of the season in Newark after having been sent to the New York Yankees where he ended his playing career at 41 years of age in 1945.

He signed to manage Beaumont in the Texas League in 1946 where his team finished fifth with a record of 70-83. In Portland the next two seasons, he finished third and fifth, winning 97 and losing 89 in 1947 and winning 89 and losing 99 in 1948. When Casey Stengel was named manager of the Yankees, Turner became pitching coach in 1949.

During his 11-year tenure with the Yankees, he developed the pitchers who led the Yanks to nine pennants and seven world championships.

Jim Turner Banner ProfileIn 1960, “Milkman Jim” (a nickname given to him because he always returned to the family farm during the off-season) returned to Nashville as general manager and field manager of the Nashville Vols. In the winter of 1958, a campaign had been initiated to organize a group to take over the financially-distressed Nashville Vols. Led by civic leaders Herschel Greer, Dr. Cleo Miller, country music star Eddie Arnold, Vols, Inc. was formed and shares in the new venture were sold at $5.00 per share. Nashville had been led on the field by manager Dick Sisler during the previous three seasons, but attendance at the gate had begun to dwindle. In 1959 the team lost only $2,300.00, but in a move that was enormously popular in Music City, Jim Turner was offered the reins of the ball club not only to improve the performance of the team on the field, but also to improve paid attendance.

The decision to attain Turner almost did not happen. “It was necessary to act quickly to get Jim Turner,” said Vols, Inc. board member Jack Norman told the Nashville Tennessean, “Jim has had several attractive offers. One particularly was pressing closely. It was therefore necessary to make an immediate decision.” Turner never divulged the offers that he had received.

With full control of the team, Turner managed the Cincinnati Reds-affiliate Vols with a roster that include catcher Johnny Edwards, utility man Rod Kanehl, and pitchers Jim Maloney and Jack Baldschun.  Turner’s 1960 Vols team finished sixth in the Southern Association, with 71 wins and 82 losses. The crowds continued to decline throughout the season, and Turner resigned at the end of the year.  He returned to the majors with assignments by the Reds that included becoming pitching coach in 1961 until his retirement in 1973.

Returning to Nashville, he continued to attend local college and amateur games, and was a season ticket holder with the Nashville Sounds with their inception in 1978 until his passing on November 29, 1998.

© 2015 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Grantland Rice Named “Sulphur Dell” On This Day

From humble beginnings as Nashville’s city park, even P. T. Barnum pitched his city of tents on the grounds of Sulphur Spring Bottom in November of 1872. Throughout its history the proximity of this lovely piece of ground was not so beautiful after late-winter’s rainfalls filled the low-lying basin.

Escalating interest in the game of “base ball” led to the formation of Nashville’s first professional team to play in the inaugural Southern League season in 1885. The grounds at Athletic Park were often in such poor condition that games were postponed, moved to another ball field at Peabody or Vanderbilt, or cancelled.

The African-American community took to the emerging National Game and cheered on their local favorites. As early as June of 1907 the semi-professional Nashville Standard Giants played at Athletic Park; renamed the Negro League Nashville Elite Giants in 1920, Sulphur Dell was often the home playing field for the team.

Grantland_RiceIn his sports column published in the Nashville Tennessean on this day, January 14, 1908, Grantland Rice referred to the local ballpark as “Sulphur Spring Dell”. In later years Nashville Banner sports editor Fred Russell intimated that Rice couldn’t find anything to rhyme with “Sulphur Spring Bottom”, as the area had been known, thus the new moniker for Nashville’s baseball home.

In subsequent columns Rice shortened the name to “Sulphur Dell”, and fans and players adopted it when referring to their beloved ballpark. When Grantland Rice first typed out the words “Sulphur Dell”, how could he have known that time would etch the name into the minds of baseball folk, casual fans, players and sportswriters across the country.

After the 1926 season ended new ownership of the Southern Association’s Nashville Volunteers decided to turn the ballpark around so fans would not be squinting in the afternoon sun. One of the visitors to the new “turned around” Sulphur Dell was player-manager Casey Stengel and his Toledo Mud Hens; Stengel hit a triple in the exhibition game against Nashville.

A few weeks later on April 7, the 65th General Assembly of Tennessee adjourned early to see Babe Ruth and the New York Yankees play the St. Louis Cardinals at Sulphur Dell. The two teams had faced each other in the past World Series with the Cardinals winning four games to three.

A resolution had been adopted to invite Ruth to address the Senate the morning of the game, but he sent word that it would be impossible for him to appear because of a lack of time. Undoubtedly the Legislature had time and observed the Cardinals beat the Yankees that day 10-8.

The first night game was played at Sulphur Dell on May 18, 1931 as the Vols lost to Mobile 8-1.

On April 12, 1932 attendance was 14,502; with seating capacity of 8,000 in the grandstands the outfield was lined off with rope to accommodate the crowd. It was the largest crowd to see a game at Sulphur Dell.

After arriving from Memphis by team bus at 4 PM on May 8, 1946 the Racine Belles checked into the Noel Hotel then made their way to Sulphur Dell to play against the Muskegon Lassies. The Belles won 8-5.

On opening day April 17, 1951, Nashville’s Sulphur Dell celebrated 24 years of service to local citizens with a new look that included a remodeled façade, new turnstiles, brick walls, wider exits and other improvements.  Unchanged were the “dumps” in the outfield and the short right field fence.

The last professional baseball game was played at Sulphur Dell on September 8, 1963, as the Vols of the South Atlantic League faced Lynchburg in a double header.  Nashville outfielder Charlie Teuscher belted three home runs as the Vols won over Lynchburg 6-3 and 2-1.

It was the last hurrah of the famous park. Amateur baseball was played at Sulphur Dell in 1964 and in 1965 it was turned into a speedway. After becoming a tow-in lot for Metro Nashville, Sulphur Dell was demolished in 1969.

Today’s recollections of great players, games, and teams honor the memory of the hallowed grounds of Sulphur Dell thanks to the “Dean of American Sportswriters”, Grantland Rice.

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It Happened On This Day: December 6 – December 21

Marquee_On_This-DayDecember 6, 1925 – Today is the birthday of former Nashville player Rance Pless. A third baseman, Pless won the Southern Association batting championship in 1952 with the Vols with a .364 average

December 7, 1914 – Nashville Baseball Club president Clyde Shropshire announces he has scheduled exhibition games with various major league teams in the spring of 1915.  Among the games to be played are a three-game set with the Chicago Cubs April 4, 5 and 6, and the New York Giants April 7 and 8.  The Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox will also play games against the Vols but the dates have not been set

December 7, 1928 – Outfielder Blackie Carter and left-handed pitcher George Milstead are purchased by Nashville from Toledo. Nashville also sells catcher Leo Mackey to Mobile and trades left-handed pitcher Oscar Fuhr to New Orleans for outfielder-first baseman Beans Minor

December 8, 1948 – Rollie Hemsley is named manager of the Nashville Vols, succeeding Larry Gilbert who moves to the front office

December 9, 1930 – Today is the birthday of Nashville outfielder Bob Hazle who batted for .314 during 1955 for the Vols. Hazle played briefly for the Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Braves, and Detroit Tigers but spent most of his career in the minors

December 10, 1957 – Pitcher Hal Kleine, who earned a 4-4 record during the 1949 season with Nashville, passes away in St. Louis. Kleine appeared in fourteen major league games with Cleveland in 1944-45 but had a 10-year minor league career until retiring after the 1950 season

December 11, 1888 – Fred Toney is born in Nashville. As one of the outstanding pitchers in the National League from 1915 to 1921, Toney led the league in saves in 1918 and won 20 games in 1917 and 1920

December 12, 1947 – Larry Gilbert announces that the Vols will spend spring training in Pensacola, Florida in 1948

December 13, 1923 – Vols catcher Paul Eiffert is traded to London, Ontario of the Michigan-Ontario League for catcher Leo Mackey

December 14, 2004 – Rod Kanehl, former Nashville Vol player, passes away in Palm Springs, California. Kanehl was the first New York Mets player to hit a grand slam home run when he accomplished the feat on July 6, 1962. Kanehl was the only former Mets player to attend the funeral of Casey Stengel

December 15, 1860 – Today is the birthday of Abner Powell, who along with Nashville’s Newt Fisher and Memphis’ Charlie Frank organized the Southern Association that began play in 1901. Powell had played and managed New Orleans in 1888 and played for Nashville’s Southern League team for eighteen games in 1894. Managing New Orleans in 1901 and 1902 and Atlanta’s entry in the new league in 1903 and 1904, he sold his interest in his team and purchased a share of the Nashville club in 1905. Powell is credited for introducing rain checks, knothole gangs, and ladies days to baseball, and innovated the covering of the playing field with a tarpaulin to keep the surface dry

December 15, 1920 – Former Nashville pitcher and future Hall of Famer Waite Hoyt is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees. During the next 10 years Hoyt will win 157 games for the Yankees

December 16, 1934 – Today is the birthday of Jim Bailey, southpaw pitcher for Nashville in 1958 (10-11), 1959 (10-6), and 1960 (7-10). He pitched in three games for the Cincinnati Reds in 1959. Born in Strawberry Plains, Tennessee, he is the brother of major league catcher Ed Bailey

December 17, 1975 – Kerby Farrell passes away in Nashville. In 1943 he played in 85 games for the Boston Braves and returned to the majors with the Chicago White Sox in 1945. He managed one season in the majors for Cleveland during 1957

December 18, 1897 – Nashville Vols manager and player Lance Richbourg is born in DeFuniak Springs, Florida. Richbourg spent six seasons with Nashville, managing from 1934-1937

December 19, 2003 – Former Nashville outfielder Carmen Mauro passes away in Carmichael, California. In his only season at Sulphur Dell in 1948 he accumulated a .284 batting average in 85 games

December 20, 1915 – Nashville acquires 3 players from the Quincy club of the Illinois-Indiana-Iowa (III) League: outfielder Roy Sherer, catcher George Boelzle, and pitcher Louis Tretter. All are secured under optional agreement

December 21, 1925 – Bob Rush, who had a 13-season career in the majors and spent part of one season with Nashville, is born in Battle Creek, Michigan. Called up mid-season after posting a 6-1 record for Des Moines in the Western League, Rush was 9-7 with the Vols in 1947 and ended the season with a 3.40 ERA

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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“Hot Rod” Kanehl: Nashville to New York

Rod “Hot Rod” Kanehl passed away on this date, December 14, 2004 in Palm Springs, California.  Born in Wichita, Kansas, he was an all-around player who hustled on every play.

He was determined to play in the major leagues, and his dream came true when he made the expansion New York Mets roster in 1962, Owned by the New York Yankees, he was drafted by the expansion Mets club on November 27, 1961 in the minor league draft.

KanehlRodKanehl played for the Nashville Vols in 1960 and 1961. On July 17, 1960, he proved that his head was in the game in the nightcap of a double header as he stole home with two outs in the bottom of the ninth against Little Rock. pitcher. Travelers catcher Don ’Stumpy’ Williams failed to ask for time out before a conference at the mound to settle down pitcher Frank Mankovitch, and Kanehl took advantage.  Vols manager Jim Turner stated that in his 38 years in Organized Ball he had never seen such a play. Kanehl’s last year in the minors was 1961, as he hit .304 for Nashville.

Although on July 6, 1962 he would become the first Mets player to hit a grand slam, in 1960 in Nashville he would not hit his first home run until August 7th. A favorite of Mets manager Casey Stengel, Kanehl was the only former Mets player who was present at the funeral of Stengel in 1975.

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