Tag Archives: Al Lopez

Vols, Inc.: New Ownership to Save Nashville Baseball, Part 7

So how did this “grand experiment” in team ownership turn out?

“Already more box seats have been sold for the opening game than there were people in the stands last April when Chattanooga bounced Those Vols to usher in the campaign…Only 1706 were present…Nashville’s largest crowd all last season was only 3232, which was on Sunday, July 27…The club’s smallest was 508 on Thursday night, Aug. 21.”[1]

Even with fans clamoring for tickets, and sales within $500.00 of last year’s early booking record of $32,425.00 of a year ago[22], McCarthy locked the office doors early on April 4 to get ready for an open house to the public the next day to show off improvements made to Sulphur Dell.

Sports writer Raymond Johnson shared some of his own excitement for the new season.

“…The green infield was as beautiful as any seen in Florida…There’ll be music between innings from an organ which was installed yesterday in the room built especially for it…Soft drinks will be a dime…Parking at the club’s two lots on the west side of Fifth avenue [sic] will be only 25 cents…The seats sparkled they were so clean…The men running the club this year plan to make the fans more comfortable…The campaign to “Swell the Dell” on opening day is in high gear…But for it to succeed, it will be necessary for some of the old timers to retrace their paths to Sulphur Dell…What do you say, fells! Let’s do it.”[23]

The first test for the fervor of Nashville baseball occurred on April 7 when manager Al Lopez and his Chicago White Sox paid a visit to Sulphur Dell to play the Vols. A start time of 3:30 P.M. was chosen so even school kids could attend. The major league club drubbed the home team 20-10 in front of 2,062 fans.

McCarthy closed the Vols baseball office early once again. On Thursday, April 9, advance ticket sales had bumped up to $37,798.40, and was optimistic there were more tickets to be sold.

“I expect the total to reach almost $40,000,” reported McCarthy.[24] Nearly every one of the 1,430 box seats had already been sold.

Former major leaguer and Nashville native Clydell Castleman, chairman of the opening day festivities, gave one more glowing testament to the support from area businesses, saying he had received “100 per cent support from the city’s industries.”

“I am especially indebted to many people, such as F. M. Acker at Du Pont; Bob Hoffman, Ford Glass company [sic]; Johnny DaVal, General Shoe; John Mihalic, Avco; George Hastings, Aladdin Lamp; Ben McDermott, Ferro corporation [sic]; Rufus Fort Jr., National Life; Allen Steele, Life and Casualty; and Postmaster Lewis Moore,” Castleman said.[25]

Gates opened at 5:45 P.M. with fans entering the ballpark with organist Fred Shoemake and the 101st Airborne Infantry Band welcoming them to Sulphur Dell. The Mobile Bears won a nail-biter over Nashville by a 13-12 score, with 4,916 fans showing up to cheer for the Vols even with the threat of rain.

“So for the 4876 Nashville optimists who helped save the city’s baseball franchise by purchasing stock last November and December, there came gleaming through the rain-dripping clouds yesterday cheerful knowledge that never before has there been so much interest in the game here,” wrote F. M. Williams.[26]

Would the excitement last throughout the season, and beyond?

This is Part 7 of the ongoing story. Read more about the events that led to the sale of the Nashville ball club in 1959 in the final installment.

Note: This Nashville baseball history was presented on Saturday, March 3, 2018 at the 15th annual Southern Association Conference at Rickwood Field in Birmingham, Alabama.

© 2018 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

Sources

newspapers.com

[21] Raymond Johnson, “Fans Get 1st Chance to See Their Dell; New Spirit Evident,” One Man’s Opinion Column, Nashville Tennessean, April 5, 1959, 23.

[22] Ibid.

[23] Ibid.

[24] F. M. Williams, “Vols’ Roster Within One of SA 19-Player Limit,” Nashville Tennessean, April 10, 1959, 39.

[25] Ibid.

[26] F. M. Williams, “Saturday Showcase: Busy Phone, Little Boys Soaring Interest Signs,” Nashville Tennessean, April 11, 1959, 11.

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