What’s In a (Nick)Name?

Over the years baseball cities have had nicknames for their teams. Fans have enjoyed rooting for more than just “the Nashvilles”, for example; to have a team name that has a connection to a city helped to build loyalty and has given newspapers a reason for added creativity to sports writing.

OLS_V_FINALNashville’s baseball team had no official team name until Grantland Rice held a contest in the Nashville Tennessean and “Volunteers” won out, far out-distancing the other two options: the Rocks and the Lime-Rocks. Nineteenth century teams had been known as the Americans, Blues, Seraphs, and Tigers.

When the Southern Association was formed in 1901, newspaper accounts refer to Nashville’s team was simply the Nashville Baseball Club. When Grantland Rice announced that “Volunteers” had won out as the official name, he wrote,

“The days of The Fishermen, The Finnites, The Boosters, The Dobbers, etc., are over…”.

Newt Fisher, Mike Finn, and Johnny Dobbs had been early managers and reporters used the managers last name with “ers” added as a connection of the team to the city’s fans.

Here is a partial list of team nicknames during the history of the Southern Association between 1901 through 1961, based on several references to team names:

ATLANTA: Firemen (1902); Crackers (1903-61)

BIRMINGHAM: Barons (1901-61); Coal Barons (1902?)

CHATTANOOGA: Lookouts (01-02, 10-61)

KNOXVILLE: Smokies (1932-44)

LITTLE ROCK: Travelers (1901-09, 15-58, 60-61)

MACON: Peaches (1961)

MEMPHIS: Egyptians (1901-07); Frankfurters (1902 – Manager was Charles Frank); Turtles (1908-11); Chickasaws/Chicks (1912-60)

MOBILE: Sea Gulls (1908-17); Bears (1918-31, 44-61)

MONTGOMERY: Black Sox (1903); Senators (1904-08); Climbers (1909-10); Billikens (1911, 14); Rebels (1912-13, 43, 56)

NASHVILLE: Volunteers (1901-03); Gray Sox (1902?); Volunteers/Vols (04-61)

NEW ORLEANS Pelicans (1901-59)

SELMA: Christians (1901)

SHREVEPORT: Giants (1901, 03); Pirates (1902, 04-07); Sports (1959-61)

© 2014 by Skip Nipper. All Rights Reserved.

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Filed under History, Research, Vintage

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