The Gloomy Side of Nashville Baseball

RIPAt some point the glory of playing the game of baseball takes a turn. Nashville has not been excluded from the realities of the gloomy side of baseball.

One of the earliest records includes a resolution passed on May 9, 1867 at a called meeting of the Nashville Baseball Club. Although there is no detail regarding his passing, the resolution of tribute is for James Maguire, a worthy and esteemed member of the club who had just died suddenly. Members voted to wear the usual badge of mourning at all matches in which their club is a party to during the current season.

The first on-field fatality involving a professional baseball club in Nashville occurred in the first season of the Nashville Americans.  On August 14, 1885, Louis Henke of the Atlanta baseball team hit a hard grounder towards Nashville’s first baseman Charles Marr. The players collided at the bag and Henke’s liver was ruptured from the force of Marr’s head hitting Henke in his abdomen.

Admitted to an Atlanta hospital, Henke died from his injuries the next day. Sadly, Marr and Henke were boyhood friends and Marr was greatly impacted by the death of his friend.

The semi-pro Nashville Maroons lost the team’s star pitcher on October 9, 1891 Pat Milliron when he was shot by well-known horse owner and trainer William Amacher. Amacher called Milliron to the stable door at West SidePark in Nashville and without warning, shot Milliron. Supposedly, the trouble occurred over a woman, and the day after the murder Amacher had not been captured.

On June 18, 1916, Nashville pitcher Tom Rogers hit Mobile third baseman Johnny Dodge with a pitch in the seventh inning of that day’s game, striking Dodge in the face, fracturing his skull.

A teammate of Rogers’ the previous season on the Nashville ball club, Dodge passed away the next day.

Another incident related to Nashville baseball occurred on September 7, 1925. Evelyn Burnette, niece of Nashville baseball club president J. A. G. Sloan, was killed when the car driven by her uncle overturned on a curve of the Dixie Highway in Tullahoma, Tennessee en route to Chattanooga for that day’s ball game.

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